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Few more resources:
submitted by Programming-Help to Programming_Languages [link] [comments]

Trojan malscripts; **what are they?**

in this post you will learn a little about publicly available information on malscripts
what is a trojan.malscript? -a quick google search turns up this result from 2014 (outdated?)
Search Results (Featured snippet from the web) Systems Affected: Windows - Trojan. Malscript is a heuristic detection for Web-based malicious script files that exploit vulnerabilities and/or perform heap spraying.-Sep 3, 2014- -Trojan.Malscript | Symantec- -https://www.symantec.com › security-center › writeup-
-not very clear!... lets try learn some more!!.. *another quick google search gives up some information about other systems not just windows affected
-If we add keywords like linux we get varied results such as this (albeit, older but w/e)
Search Results (Featured snippet from the web) -Systems Affected: Linux, Mac, Solaris, Windows.- Trojan. Malscript. C is a generic detection for HTML files infected with a JavaScript that redirects the browser to a malicious Web site that may exploit the browser or download other malicious threats.-Jan 30, 2010- -Trojan.Malscript.C | Technical Details | Removing Help ...- -https://us.norton.com › trojan.malscript.c-2010-013011-2940-99-writeup.html-
so given a couple quick searches we can guess a bit -we need: *java *HTML *access to the internet somehow (could be by an offline file touching an online source; this puts the item at risk for "contracting" offline ai or crawling codes)
another way would be
*write a "safe" code on here on reddit but its gonna take me time since reddit allows this:
if 1 * 2 < 3: print "hello, world!" 
this can be achieved by possibly writing a code to a site that had malscripts already deployed such as an embed code, or request in an "iframe"
  • Alot of people may remember sites such as:
https://www.xanga.com and various other places; *these places allowed HTML editing for themes and overall page layout -sites such as http://www.neopets.com etc. had/have this ability as well.

-these sites are great examples of how easy it could be to place an HTML or java malscript that was made to either be good/bad/both; especially now, given our extremely large usage of internet!
Sure; #scareme... what can a trojan.malscript do!
quick learned facts:
-exploits an available resource via internets (lol)
-is a form of 'script' (really generic term) that employs heuristic based approach; defined as and asked to google before:
What is a heuristic approach?- -“A heuristic technique, often called simply a heuristic, is any approach to problem solving, learning, or discovery that employs a practical method not guaranteed to be optimal or perfect, but sufficient for the immediate goals.-Feb 5, 2018- -Heuristic Approaches to Problem Solving- | -101 Computing- -https://www.101computing.net › heuristic-approaches-to-problem-solving-
-may perfrom heap spraying which is defined here
A heap spraying attack is a remote code execution exploit that allows the attacker to insert arbitrary code in the system's heap memory space. ... The spray is followed by exploit code that, when inserted into the heap memory, will exploit a weakness or vulnerability, allowing the code to execute on the system.-Aug 11, 2010- -Heap Spraying Buffer Overflow Attacks - Cisco.com- -https://tools.cisco.com › center › resources › security-alerts-announcement-
WAIT! isnt that good...or bad...or OMG wth! #notscared?scared?
it really depends 0.o
-why is there a malscript in the first place; this is a great place to start asking questions for any individual or business by asking what OS is being used and what version/type/grade/blahblah
I use windows xp, windows xp is a "unsupported"(mostly) os - I use it to dissect information. its wonderful! also sucks sometimes when the software is riddled with holes and various other "things" shoutout to Microsoft for updates in DEC 2019! x<.3
Windows xp pro sp3 5.1.2600
x86
smbios2.4
I use AVG anti-virus with highest settings and personal settings that the free version can have
get to know my computer better? #thisajoke??
Nah, over the years Ive collected knowledge and some more common answers to basic questions in cyber security, qustions like "what is a malscript"? have simple answers, mostly... things like these 5 objects can be defined as being malscript:
  • Anti-virus
  • Anti-malware
  • anti-execution mechanisms
  • any word processor may or may not be defined as malscript if it can "spell check" your work or place a timestamp
  • third party input/output mechanism; things such as mouses, sd, usb, cd, internet(s) that crawl for information like web.archive, bitcoin code, cryptocode overall if it has a weakness to malscripted behaviours
there are MULTIPLE other reasons, one such problem is:
mass-malware campaigns and adware from older computers attempting to propogate and control older versions of networks that no longer work as expected/coded to seek
^ this type of malscript "poorly planned, and hastily executed or outdated"; can have adverse impacts on the internet as a whole - not just for the computers expected to be impacted.
ok, malscripts. so what can #I do?
when approaching cyber security its easy to become overwhelmed by the amount of information that is available; to research; to dissect; to use as examples...
what the best thing anyone or a group can do?;
attempt to make an effort to learn about the item a bit before, using or expecting them to work a certain way; due to a biased info source like ones own
also:
seek outside sources, but also be careful an use knowledge seeked as knowledge that may or may not be "useful" for the current project or situation...
this post was an attempt to gain knowledge and some skills in writing and information sharing.
thanks everyone!
hope you enjoy my reading material!!
Have a Awwww-some new year!
ReachOutForBits recommends "useless" backup scanning after securely and safely removing identifiable information before scanning at https://www.virustotal.com before resell of computer or devices ; in order to avoid costly data blunders such as
ids/creds cloning
phonenumber collection
email collection
by persistent threats that are EXTREMELY HARD TO DETECT ; even penetrating some hardwares with advanced capabilities such as "sleeping" AI or, Run-mocking AI!
think of all the people who said AI will skynet us; maybe AI is just a stepping stone for some BAD F-IN MALWARE that someone has written that needs no C&C mechanism or user interaction at all - not the AI itself persay.
this is one form of persistant threat that needs to be identified to ensure non-tainted, verifiable, security information results into the future and beyond...
other threats include:
  • over-patriotic; otherwise defined as "EXTREMIST" - individuals of ANY COUNTRY, ANY RELIGION, ANY CREED, ANY BELIEF or OATH or CONSTITUTIONAL AGREEMENT.
  • fake bomb threats and faux-emergency calls
  • PAID INFORMANTS AND THEIR COUNTERPARTS
  • So called, anons, that gather in groups and communicate between each-other; effectively destroying the meaning of being ANON. singular noun
    the types of people(s) that write their own definition at urbandictionary and then proceed to agree together that thats it.
    • ahha, hah..hahahah...this is funnny....get this:
    -they also gather en-masse in attempts to overwhelm and proceed to cause irreprible cost or some form of damage - rarely peaceful anymore.
names like troll are no longer what they were, fictional characters under a bridge; troll is now Pseudonym for prankster(s) @ anycost
  • Crypto-currency Jackers who have designed tech to prevent proper payments and reward systems (at-source or in-transit) from being implemented; according to consensus.
  • Outdated, over-sourced(more than 10 downloads) malware
  • Junk and bloat that often comes preinstalled with no intention of caring whether or not the user will actually "use" it.
    this type of item hogs CPU/GPU and introduces ill timed updates that cannot be controlled!
STAY SAFE
submitted by killabell33 to MinimalistHacking [link] [comments]

Buona spiegazione di meltdown & spectre.

Tl;dr: Ci sono due bug nella gestione di memoria di tutte le CPU in uso da 20 anni a questa parte. Il loro effetto è di permettere ad un processo in stato non privilegiato di leggere la memoria del kernel (Meltdown) e/o di un altro processo (Spectre). Questo si può usare (ad esempio) per fare un keylogger e leggere password, # di carta di credito etc. mentre vengono scritti. I possibili exploit funzionano su tutti i sistemi operativi (sì, anche sui telefoni, e sui dispositivi IOT, e sugli embedded), ipervisori (sì, anche cross-domain) e da ogni tipo di userspace - in particolare al momento è possibile farlo da uno snippet javascript che giri nella finestra di un browser. Non riesco a immaginare un motivo per cui non si possa fare da PHP, che so, in un plugin di wordpress. Le patch, che non sono ancora state messe in distribuzione generale, sono efficaci solo contro Meltdown (Spectre è più difficile da sfruttare, per fortuna, ma è anche capito peggio). Non solo, ma rallentano le prestazioni (fino al 20% in alcuni benchmark di postgres) e aumentano l'uso della CPU (un cloud provider ha visto la CPU post-patch raddoppiare).
Buon 20181.
1) Primo tentativo di aggiornare il kernel di una VM (presumibilmente con la patch anti-Meltdown). Risultato: VM non-bootabile. Groan.
*"By now, most of you have probably already heard of the biggest disaster in the history of IT – Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities which affect all modern CPUs, from those in desktops and servers, to ones found in smartphones. Unfortunately, there's much confusion about the level of threat we're dealing with here, because some of the impacted vendors need reasons to explain the still-missing security patches. But even those who did release a patch, avoid mentioning that it only partially addresses the threat. And, there's no good explanation of these vulnerabilities on the right level (not for developers), something that just about anyone working in IT could understand to make their own conclusion. So, I decided to give it a shot and deliver just that.
First, some essential background. Both vulnerabilities leverage the "speculative execution" feature, which is central to the modern CPU architecture. Without this, processors would idle most of the time, just waiting to receive I/O results from various peripheral devices, which are all at least 10x slower than processors. For example, RAM – kind of the fastest thing out there in our mind – runs at comparable frequencies with CPU, but all overclocking enthusiasts know that RAM I/O involves multiple stages, each taking multiple CPU cycles. And hard disks are at least a hundred times slower than RAM. So, instead of waiting for the real result of some IF clause to be calculated, the processor assumes the most probable result, and continues the execution according to the assumed result. Then, many cycles later, when the actual result of said IF is known, if it was "guessed" right – then we're already way ahead in the program code execution path, and didn't just waste all those cycles waiting for the I/O operation to complete. However, if it appears that the assumption was incorrect - then, the execution state of that "parallel universe" is simply discarded, and program execution is restarted back from said IF clause (as if speculative execution did not exist). But, since those prediction algorithms are pretty smart and polished, more often than not the guesses are right, which adds significant boost to execution performance for some software. Speculative execution is a feature that processors had for two decades now, which is also why any CPU that is still able to run these days is affected.
Now, while the two vulnerabilities are distinctly different, they share one thing in common – and that is, they exploit the cornerstone of computer security, and specifically the process isolation. Basically, the security of all operating systems and software is completely dependent on the native ability of CPUs to ensure complete process isolation in terms of them being able to access each other's memory. How exactly is such isolation achieved? Instead of having direct physical RAM access, all processes operate in virtual address spaces, which are mapped to physical RAM in the way that they do not overlap. These memory allocations are performed and controlled in hardware, in the so-called Memory Management Unit (MMU) of CPU.
At this point, you already know enough to understand Meltdown. This vulnerability is basically a bug in MMU logic, and is caused by skipping address checks during the speculative execution (rumors are, there's the source code comment saying this was done "not to break optimizations"). So, how can this vulnerability be exploited? Pretty easily, in fact. First, the malicious code should trick a processor into the speculative execution path, and from there, perform an unrestricted read of another process' memory. Simple as that. Now, you may rightfully wonder, wouldn't the results obtained from such a speculative execution be discarded completely, as soon as CPU finds out it "took a wrong turn"? You're absolutely correct, they are in fact discarded... with one exception – they will remain in the CPU cache, which is a completely dumb thing that just caches everything CPU accesses. And, while no process can read the content of the CPU cache directly, there's a technique of how you can "read" one implicitly by doing legitimate RAM reads within your process, and measuring the response times (anything stored in the CPU cache will obviously be served much faster). You may have already heard that browser vendors are currently busy releasing patches that makes JavaScript timers more "coarse" - now you know why (but more on this later).
As far as the impact goes, Meltdown is limited to Intel and ARM processors only, with AMD CPUs unaffected. But for Intel, Meltdown is extremely nasty, because it is so easy to exploit – one of our enthusiasts compiled the exploit literally over a morning coffee, and confirmed it works on every single computer he had access to (in his case, most are Linux-based). And possibilities Meltdown opens are truly terrifying, for example how about obtaining admin password as it is being typed in another process running on the same OS? Or accessing your precious bitcoin wallet? Of course, you'll say that the exploit must first be delivered to the attacked computer and executed there – which is fair, but here's the catch: JavaScript from some web site running in your browser will do just fine too, so the delivery part is the easiest for now. By the way, keep in mind that those 3rd party ads displayed on legitimate web sites often include JavaScript too – so it's really a good idea to install ad blocker now, if you haven't already! And for those using Chrome, enabling Site Isolation feature is also a good idea.
OK, so let's switch to Spectre next. This vulnerability is known to affect all modern CPUs, albeit to a different extent. It is not based on a bug per say, but rather on a design peculiarity of the execution path prediction logic, which is implemented by so-called Branch Prediction Unit (BPU). Essentially, what BPU does is accumulating statistics to estimate the probability of IF clause results. For example, if certain IF clause that compares some variable to zero returned FALSE 100 times in a row, you can predict with high probability that the clause will return FALSE when called for the 101st time, and speculatively move along the corresponding code execution branch even without having to load the actual variable. Makes perfect sense, right? However, the problem here is that while collecting this statistics, BPU does NOT distinguish between different processes for added "learning" effectiveness – which makes sense too, because computer programs share much in common (common algorithms, constructs implementation best practices and so on). And this is exactly what the exploit is based on: this peculiarity allows the malicious code to basically "train" BPU by running a construct that is identical to one in the attacked process hundreds of times, effectively enabling it to control speculative execution of the attacked process once it hits its own respective construct, making one dump "good stuff" into the CPU cache. Pretty awesome find, right?
But here comes the major difference between Meltdown and Spectre, which significantly complicates Spectre-based exploits implementation. While Meltdown can "scan" CPU cache directly (since the sought-after value was put there from within the scope of process running the Meltdown exploit), in case of Spectre it is the victim process itself that puts this value into the CPU cache. Thus, only the victim process itself is able to perform that timing-based CPU cache "scan". Luckily for hackers, we live in the API-first world, where every decent app has API you can call to make it do the things you need, again measuring how long the execution of each API call took. Although getting the actual value requires deep analysis of the specific application, so this approach is only worth pursuing with the open-source apps. But the "beauty" of Spectre is that apparently, there are many ways to make the victim process leak its data to the CPU cache through speculative execution in the way that allows the attacking process to "pick it up". Google engineers found and documented a few, but unfortunately many more are expected to exist. Who will find them first?
Of course, all of that only sounds easy at a conceptual level - while implementations with the real-world apps are extremely complex, and when I say "extremely" I really mean that. For example, Google engineers created a Spectre exploit POC that, running inside a KVM guest, can read host kernel memory at a rate of over 1500 bytes/second. However, before the attack can be performed, the exploit requires initialization that takes 30 minutes! So clearly, there's a lot of math involved there. But if Google engineers could do that, hackers will be able too – because looking at how advanced some of the ransomware we saw last year was, one might wonder if it was written by folks who Google could not offer the salary or the position they wanted. It's also worth mentioning here that a JavaScript-based POC also exists already, making the browser a viable attack vector for Spectre.
Now, the most important part – what do we do about those vulnerabilities? Well, it would appear that Intel and Google disclosed the vulnerability to all major vendors in advance, so by now most have already released patches. By the way, we really owe a big "thank you" to all those dev and QC folks who were working hard on patches while we were celebrating – just imagine the amount of work and testing required here, when changes are made to the holy grail of the operating system. Anyway, after reading the above, I hope you agree that vulnerabilities do not get more critical than these two, so be sure to install those patches ASAP. And, aside of most obvious stuff like your operating systems and hypervisors, be sure not to overlook any storage, network and other appliances – as they all run on some OS that too needs to be patched against these vulnerabilities. And don't forget your smartphones! By the way, here's one good community tracker for all security bulletins (Microsoft is not listed there, but they did push the corresponding emergency update to Windows Update back on January 3rd).
Having said that, there are a couple of important things you should keep in mind about those patches. First, they do come with a performance impact. Again, some folks will want you to think that the impact is negligible, but it's only true for applications with low I/O activity. While many enterprise apps will definitely take a big hit – at least, big enough to account for. For example, installing the patch resulted in almost 20% performance drop in the PostgreSQL benchmark. And then, there is this major cloud service that saw CPU usage double after installing the patch on one of its servers. This impact is caused due to the patch adding significant overhead to so-called syscalls, which is what computer programs must use for any interactions with the outside world.
Last but not least, do know that while those patches fully address Meltdown, they only address a few currently known attacks vector that Spectre enables. Most security specialists agree that Spectre vulnerability opens a whole slew of "opportunities" for hackers, and that the solid fix can only be delivered in CPU hardware. Which in turn probably means at least two years until first such processor appears – and then a few more years until you replace the last impacted CPU. But until that happens, it sounds like we should all be looking forward to many fun years of jumping on yet another critical patch against some newly discovered Spectre-based attack. Happy New Year! Chinese horoscope says 2018 will be the year of the Earth Dog - but my horoscope tells me it will be the year of the Air Gapped Backup.”*
1) Primo tentativo di aggiornare il kernel di una VM (presumibilmente con la patch anti-Meltdown). Risultato: VM non-bootabile. Groan.
submitted by MonsieurCellophane to ItalyInformatica [link] [comments]

My band trying to use Bitcoin for mp3 downloads. Does it have to be this complicated?

Hello, My acoustic folk anarcho-punk band has been trying to configure our website to accept Bitcoins for users to download our mp3s, but everything seems so complicated!
Is there an easy way for us to allow users to send 25 cents in Bitcoin to our Bitcoin address and then in return they are re-directed to our mp3 file for download?
We've tried Blockchains API which didn't really get us anywhere the instructions are vague and not very useful. I read some instructions on stackoverlow but we would have to download the entire blockchain and run a bitcoind? No way are we doing that! There are no youtube videos on how to set up a simple Bitcoin payment portal. It's very frustrating to want to accept this currency but not have any good resources available.
P.S. we are not total computer idiots. We built our own website and I know html. Our drummer knows PHP and javascript. With our powers combined I thought we would have no problem putting this together, but I was wrong. I just want a simple code snippet I can enter in our existing website code that tells the user to send 250 bits or 25 cents or whatever and once they do they are given our mp3. I don't want the user to have to leave our website for this either.
Any options for us, or is Bitcoin not ready for this type of easy implementation yet?
EDIT: SOLUTION Thanks to everyone for their help, suggestions and solutions.
xbtdev suggested satoshibox.com - this is a great solution for someone with no coding experience. No registration required, just upload and they give you a link or a snippet of code.
grintor provided us with a solution using blockchain's API. This is the type of code we were looking for. The code is pretty straight forward and light weight, and does not require a database or even use of PHP sessions. https://github.com/grintoantiquesons
We tried using Blockchain's API on our own but we didn't get anywhere as there were little to no instructions available. A tutorial on using their API would be helpful and I'm surprised one does not exist yet (hint, hint youtubers). We awarded Grintor with 100,000 bits for providing the working code.
Several people suggested coinbase and bitpay. They are easy to use but this wasn't the type of integration we were looking for.
farts2much linked us to a work in progress code https://github.com/jswebdevel/btcbox This project looks promising and we'll keep an eye on it.
Running a full node and bitcoind was an option if we wanted to avoid all 3rd parties, but I don't believe this is a practical solution for everyone.
Again, thank you all for your help and support!
submitted by antiquesons to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I'm writing a web app (Flask, Tornado) and would appreciate an expert's opinion on best practices. I don't know any other Python devs in real life :(

I don't know how/where to ask this, so if I chose the incorrect site and subreddit forward me along :)
But I've been working on a project for around a week and I don't know if I'm approaching it correctly. Right now I'm using:
I'm using Python 2.7.5, with Debian on my production server, Windows 7 with Debian VM on my dev box.
Basically, I just need help. This isn't the first web project I've done .. but it's by far the most complicated. I know I'm not doing some things right and want to fix them before it gets too far along.
I would love to talk with someone for 20 minutes about any of the following:
I'm studying CS in school but picked up all the python-web-stuff on my own over the last year or so, and I don't think I'm doing it right. As a broke college kid I can't pay for your time but might be able to exchange something instead.
Thank you in advance if you can help me with any of the above topics.
Note) I should note that everything WORKS, so this isn't a "how do I get this and this working for that to happen" -- I could finish the project without any answers. I just want to tighten security and make sure I learned things correctly while spending so much time on a "major" project for myself.
Also, I'm still waiting on the Flask text book from kickstarter if the author happens to see this post ;)
submitted by LightShadow to Python [link] [comments]

Some quotes from Ethereum blockchain

Shouts and celebrations
Enquiries
About bitcoin
About life
... and drinks
German is a popular language
Words
... and code.
Enjoy.
submitted by pirapira to ethereum [link] [comments]

SHA256 and Bitcoin Addresses

Does anyone know if I can use AppInventor to generate bitcoin addresses and sign transactions? I'd like to be able to put together an open source basic wallet that others and I can learn on. If you have any thoughts or ideas please share. Together we can make something awesome.
Update:
submitted by NedRadnad to AppInventor [link] [comments]

Bitcoin - Round Table snippet, ep.2 Bitcoin Lesson  Script Bitcoin from the Command Line - Sending Bitcoin Transactions Programmatically with Javascript Bitcoins Snippet -Trap Guapo Code Faster With Custom VS Code Snippets

6. 30 seconds of code. Category: snippets. 30 seconds of code is the official extension of the project by the same name, that I happen to maintain. While I’m certain there are many other snippet extensions, this one is a favorite of mine, due to the amount and diversity of snippets in it. Discover 33,936 Plugins, Code and Script for Bootstrap, Javascript, PHP, Wordpress, HTML5 and more. Save time, buy Code on CodeCanyon! Access tutorials, blog posts, video streams and code snippets to help you go from being a hobbyist to a professional step by step. Develop With the power of Bitcoin Cash, the ease of BITBOX and the Bitcoin.com developer platform, you’ll create your most innovative apps ever. In this blog post we will see how we can generate bitcoin wallet using javascript. I'll list few code snippets here, link to full code is given at the end of post. This blog post is for learning purposes, the code used here is not fit for production systems or generating new addresses, USE AT YOUR OWN RISK The following is a list of sample source code snippets that matched your search term. Source code snippets are chunks of source code that were found out on the Web that you can cut and paste into your own source code. Bitcoin: 06.02.2020: BCH JavaScript Sample Code by Permissionless Software Foundation : This JavaScript Sample Code are

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Bitcoin - Round Table snippet, ep.2

Here's a short sneak peek of the Round Table discussion from Kids in the Tank, episode 2 with Lori Cheek. Full episode coming soon! ----- About BizTank Career Exploration Program BizTank provides ... A simple yet full explanation of how the Script language in Bitcoin works. Includes examples of the most commonly used locking scripts (and unlocking scripts), with animations showing how they are ... Visual Studio Code (also known as VS Code) is a popular code editor among software developers. In this video I will show you how to use code snippets to write Javascript and React code faster and ... A quick overview of the Bitcoin Cash JavaScript Toolbox I've been developing for application developers. This is a snippet from earlier after Bitcoin broke down, I like my commentary so I thought I would post it. Follow me on Twitter! @realcryptotrade POWER HOUR...

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