Largest Cloud Bitcoin Mining Company | Genesis Mining

CelesOS Research Institute丨DPoW consensus mechanism-combustible mining and voting

CelesOS Research Institute丨DPoW consensus mechanism-combustible mining and voting
The token economy and the blockchain complement each other, while at the same time, the consensus mechanism forms the basis of the blockchain, whom constitutes the basic technical framework of the token economy.
The mainstream blockchain, like Bitcoin, Ethereum, and EOS have all compromised on certain aspects of the "impossible triangle" features.
https://preview.redd.it/8ocq98swpt551.png?width=554&format=png&auto=webp&s=37ab0235c07b450217e22531ad5291d5b4bcbbee
Bitcoin, as a decentralized digital currency, has sacrificed performance to meet the design requirements of decentralization and security, rendering it the target of highest attacking cost among all PoW public chains. The ASIC mining machines updates continually and new versions launch, both can continuously improve the computing power of the entire network.
Ethereum 2.0 will use a proof of stake (PoS) consensus mechanism. On the Ethereum network, money can be transfered and smart contracts can be operated, presenting a more complicated application scenario. However, due to its low performance, Ethereum is more prone to get congested.
EOS, as a blockchain application platform, is often suspected of being centralized. EOS uses a delegated proof of stake (DPoS) consensus mechanism. Having 21 super nodes responsible for bookkeeping and block generation, the EOS main network can handle more than 4,000 TPS now. However, due to its small number of nodes, it’s one of the three major public chains that are most easily questioned by the outside world on the "decentralization" feature.
An inefficient blockchain will only be a game in the laboratory, and an efficient blockchain without decentralization will only be taken advantage of by big players.
New generation consensus algorithm DPoW
Is there any consensus mechanism that can achieve a better balance between decentralization and efficiency, and can give miners incentives to invest in hardware resources? If we separate the two acts of "acquiring accounting rights" and "receiving block rewards", the above dilemma can be solved. By separating the above two, DPoW has finally achieved the effect of balancing efficiency and centralization.

https://preview.redd.it/www3h8swpt551.png?width=731&format=png&auto=webp&s=c0bf49a42751a9501828d0294bc9280f856c441e
Drawing on the design concept and operating experience of the preceding consensus mechanisms, DPoW is a new-generation consensus mechanism formed based on PoB and DPoS.
Before explaining DPoW, it’s necessary to introduce PoB.
PoB (Proof of Burn) is called the burning proof mechanism. (Source: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Proof_of_burn))

https://preview.redd.it/payq2duzpt551.png?width=554&format=png&auto=webp&s=4b8e9181d95d31a8d5b75a7acab27c851a4a3a4d
PoB is a way to vote who has a commitment to the leadership of the network by burning tokens possessed. The greater the number of tokens burned, the higher the probability of gaining network leadership.
PoB is a method of distributed consensus and an alternative method of proof-of-work mechanism. It can also be used to guide a cryptocurrency.

https://preview.redd.it/4lmhs1i1qt551.png?width=554&format=png&auto=webp&s=e8c50b1638d8ec8d8a2dac2e842b50a2979984fb
In the DPoW-based blockchain, the miner's mining reward is no longer a token, but a "wood" that can be burned-burning wood. Through the hash algorithm, miners use their own computing power to get the corresponding non-tradable wood after proving their workload eventually. When the wood has accumulated to a certain amount, it can be burnt in the burning site.
DPoW technical solutions
Voting with computing power is the biggest innovation of the present invention. It uses the proof of work of the PoW algorithm to replace the stakes as votes, yet retains the BFT-DPoS block generation mechanism.
Specific steps are as follow:
  1. POW question acquisition
Obtain the question of proof of work. The proof of work of the present invention is to perform a Hash operation on a PoW problem; the questions is:
target = hash(block_id + account) ^ difficulty 
  1. POW question answering
A mathematical hash operation of a random number (nonce) is performed on the question, and if the hash value obtained is less than a certain value, the question is answered;
Question answering process:
nonce = random ()ret = max() while(ret > target) { if(hash(nonce+account + block_id)< target) { wood = nonce; break; } nonce++; } 
  1. Voting
Voting is to cast the specific answers to the question to the candidate BP. By such, it’s submitted to the blockchain and counted to the blockchain's status database; within an election period, the maximum value of the answer that each voter can calculate is N, and each answer can only be voted to one candidate BP, and the number of votes that can be cast is N.
The information and process that voting requires:
  • Answer to the question
  • Miner account
  • Block id
  • Block
  • Voting objects (candidate BP)
  • Verify that the vote is valid
  • After verification, it will be credited to BP
4. Count the votes
At the end of an election period, votes are counted and sorted top-down according to the number of votes under the name of the candidate BP. The top X candidate BPs are selected and inserted into the BP list, and the block generating order of the selected BP is written to the blockchain status database.
If X is the number of BPs generated by the system, namely a multiple of 3, it will be set in the genesis block and cannot be changed.
  1. Block generation
The DPoW block generation mechanism is the same as BFT-DPoS. The elected BP negotiates a block generation ownership order based on its own network resource status. When each BP node has block generation rights, the block reward is a fixed reward for each effective irreversible block. At the same time, the blocks that have been generated use the BFT signature mechanism. After getting 2/3 BP's signature, the block will become an irreversible block.
DPoW’s advantage in balance
Compared with existing technical solutions, the DPoW consensus protocol has the following feature.
  1. When the stock of burning wood is large, the nodes in the system tend to burn burning wood to vote instead of logging through computing power, which is similar to the DPoS under this situation.
  2. When the stock of burning wood is few, the nodes in this system tend to log to obtain burning wood for voting, which is similar to PoW under this situation, presenting the feature of decentralization. In order to ensure the high-speed operation of the system and attract ticket sources, BP will maintain a stable investment in computer resources to keep the system highly efficient.
Choosing to vote by logging or burning wood depends on the nodes’ own optimal choice, resulting in constant choosing between the two consensus mechanisms of PoW and DPoS. This will make nodes tend to choose PoW when decentralization is needed, and to choose DPoS when efficiency is needed.
For a system, whether it is decentralized does not depend on whether each block needs to be decentralized. The key is whether the system can provide a channel to decentralization and fair competition when needed. As long as the channel is reasonable, the system will be considered decentralized.
By decoupling vote by logging and block generation, they can be done asynchronously to achieve the effects of decentralization and high efficiency.
Learning and updating the preceding practices in blockchain technology, DPoW manages to achieve both decentralization and efficiency, as “having the cake and eating it”.

📷Website
https://www.celesos.com/
📷 Telegram
https://t.me/celeschain
📷 Twitter
https://twitter.com/CelesChain
📷 Reddit
https://www.reddit.com/useCelesOS
📷 Medium
https://medium.com/@celesos
📷 Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/CelesOS1
📷 Youtube
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1Xsd8wU957D-R8RQVZPfGA
submitted by CelesOS to u/CelesOS [link] [comments]

White Paper, Miner, Pizza … | "Old Objects" in the Cryptocurrency Museum

White Paper, Miner, Pizza … |
https://preview.redd.it/giu1ssilga151.jpg?width=900&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=41510785ccdc0d99544ec74229f62427d1c0ce3e
Museum has played the role of a time recorder. Talking about bitcoin, more than ten years has passed since the creation of it. Although it is uncomparable to the stock market with a hundred years of history, during the ten years, in the different stages of the development of bitcoin and blockchain have continuously poured in geeks, miners, speculators, newbies, leaving keywords such as sudden rich, myth, scam, belief, revolution, etc.
There are also many “old objects” with stories in the “Museum” of the cryptocurrency realm. On Museum Day, let ’s review the stories brought by these “old objects”.
The First Digital Currency White Paper — Bitcoin White Paper
On Oct. 31, 2008, Satoshi Nakamoto released the Bitcoin white paper — A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System in the cryptographic mail group where he belongs, and Bitcoin was born since then.
A white paper is a document that explains the purpose and technology used in cryptocurrency. Usually a cryptocurrency uses the white paper to help people understand what it provides, and it is also an important information channel for investors to understand a project. Therefore, the level of the white paper affects people’s confidence towards the coin.
In a word, in the cryptocurrency and blockchain industry, the value of a white paper is equivalent to that of a standard financing speech. The white paper plays a vital role in this emerging market.
The First Public Bitcoin-Physical Transaction — Pizza
Since Satoshi Nakamoto mined the Bitcoin genesis block on January 3, 2009, Bitcoin has only been spread among the small crowd and has not realized its value.
Not until May 22, 2010, Bitcoin enthusiast “Laszlo Hanyecz” bought a pizza coupon worth $25 with 10,000 bitcoins. This is the first public bitcoin-physical transaction. Bitcoin has its price with 0.3 cents per bitcoin.


This day has also become the famous “Bitcoin Pizza Day” in Bitcoin history. Bitcoin as the imagination of the financial system has more practical significance. The tenth anniversary is coming. How will you commemorate it? Will you buy a pizza?
The First Digital Asset Exchange — Bitcoinmarket.com
After the birth of Bitcoin, in addition to mining, the only way to get Bitcoin in the early days was to conduct transactions on forums or IRC (commonly known as Internet Relay Chat). However, this method involves both long transaction time and great security risk.
In March 2010, the first digital asset exchange — Bitcoinmarket.com launched. However, due to lack of liquidity and transaction depth, it disappeared soon after its establishment, but Bitcoinmarket.com opened the era of the operation of the cryptocurrency realm exchange 1.0.


On June 9, 2011, China’s first Bitcoin exchange — Bitcoin China (BTCChina) launched. Its founder, Yang Linke, translated Bitcoin into Chinese “比特币” for the first time. In 2013, China’s bitcoin trading entered the golden age, and exchanges sprung up. China monopolized more than 90% of the world’s bitcoin transactions. Now, if the top three exchanges Binance, Huobi Global, OKEx are the Exchange 2.0, then the index exchange represented by 58COIN called the 3.0 version, leading the trend.
The First Generation of High-Performance Miner — ASIC Miner
When Satoshi Nakamoto created Bitcoin, the only way to get it is to use computers (including home computers) to mine, mainly relying on the CPU to calculate. However, as the value of digital currencies such as Bitcoin has become higher and higher, mining has become an industry with the competition is getting fiercer, accompanied by increasing difficulty of mining. Therefore, hardware performance competition starts.
In July 2012, the genius Jiang Xinyu (Internet nickname is “Friedcat”) from the junior class of the University of Science and Technology declared at the forum that he could make ASIC miners (chips). As far as mining computing power is concerned, ASICs can be tens of thousands or more higher than the same-generation CPUs and GPUs.
At the beginning of 2013, Zhang Nanqian (Pumpkin Zhang), a suspended doctoral student from the Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, developed the ASIC miner and named it “Avalon”.


In June 2013, the Friedcat’s miner USB was finally released, and it maintained 20% of the computing power of the entire network.
At the end of 2013, Wu Jihan, used the tens of millions yuan earned from Friedcat through investment, worked together with Jenke group, to develop the Antminer S1. Since then, the miner manufacturer Bitmain began to enter the stage of history.
It is no exaggeration to say that Friedcat and Zhang Nangeng have opened the domestic “mining” era.
The Birthplace of China’s Bitcoin — Garage Coffee
It is not only the “old objects” that record history, but also a place that everyone in the cryptocurrency realm aspires to.
Guo Hongcai once said, “Without no The Garage Café, there will be no cryptocurrency realm today. Since it is a very mysterious place that all waves of people from the café joint together to create today’s digital asset industry.

▲ In March 2013, American student Jake Smith successfully purchased a cup of coffee at The Garage Café with 0.131 bitcoins. This move attracted the attention of CCTV, and it conducted an interview.
Indeed, The Garage Café is the world ’s first entrepreneurial-themed coffee shop. It has been legendary since its establishment in 2011. The Garage Cafét is not only the core coordinate on China’s Bitcoin map, but also the birthplace of the Chinese cryptocurrency circle, where digital asset realm tycoons including Guo Hongcai, Zhao Dong, Li Xiaolai, Li Lin have made their ways.
The development of digital currency is only 11 years old. Through these “old objects”, we review the various stories of this wave of technology together, hoping to help you understand the development process of the digital currency field. Meanwhile, I also remind all practitioners to use history as a mirror and forge ahead.
Website: https://www.58ex.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/58_coin
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coin.58COIN
Telegram: https://t.me/official58
Medium: https://medium.com/@58coin_blog/
submitted by 58CoinExchange to u/58CoinExchange [link] [comments]

Is Genesis Mining worth it? I created a Genesis Mining profitability calculator in Google sheets to find out.

TL;DR: I attempt to overcome the pitfalls of forecasting genesis mining contract profitability for Ethereum, Monero, and Zcash.
The original Medium post can be found here: https://medium.com/@spreadstreet/is-genesis-mining-worth-it-a-genesis-mining-profitability-calculator-youll-actually-use-a06d916bf7bc
BitPay is on pace to process over $1B annually in bitcoin payment acceptance and payouts, and has already grown their payments dollar volume 328% year-over-year, according to a recent blog post on the BitPay website.
The very nature of cryptocurrencies requires transactions to be verified by miners. What does this mean?
  1. Cryptocurrency transactions are verified by a network of nodes, then recorded in a publicly distributed ledger known as a “blockchain”, which authenticates the coins as monetary units of measurement – or money.
  2. Cryptocurrency mining refers to coins created as a reward in which the users of the network verify and record transactions on this very blockchain. Users who are able to successfully verify the transactions receive fees and rewards in the form of brand new coins.
And Genesis Mining stands as the largest cryptocurrency cloud mining company in the world.
A user can rent "hashing power" in the form of a two-year contract from Genesis for a one-time, upfront fee.
In turn, they receive daily payouts of whatever specific cryptocurrency they purchased the contract for.

THE PROBLEM

While Genesis Mining has done a great job breaking down a complex problem into an easy-to-understand business model, users consistently have one big question:
"How profitable is {x} contract?" - Everybody, ever
While the user is able to see the upfront cost, they are unable to get an idea of how many coins they will receive by the end of the contract.

WHY THE PROBLEM EXISTS

The problem exists, because of two major uncertainties surrounding cryptocurrencies:
  1. Where the price of the currency will fluctuate over time
  2. Where the network hashrate (aka, the mining power of the entire network) will fluctuate over time
Both of these inputs are extremely volatile, and have a huge degree of uncertainty in the near and distant future.
What I will attempt to do in this exercise, is build a profitability calculator for Ethereum, Monero, and Zcash. Each of these cryptocurrencies is currently available on the website as of 11/7/2017.
Each cryptocurrency has three contracts, and I will formulate 4 different scenarios to try and capture a profitability "range".
Note: Do not take any of the words in this post as financial advice or recommendations. These are merely simulations that have their own issues and pitfalls, and are not to be used as the end-all, be-all decision.

THE ASSUMPTIONS

Due to the difficulty in forecasting both price and nethash, I was forced into a few assumptions:
  1. The forecasted price method is a Monte Carlo simulation using a geometric Brownian Motion ran 1,000 times. I covered the full methodology in a prior blog post
  2. The base network hashrate follows along very closely with the movements in price. This assumption I am the least confident about, as network hash has been shown to deviate at certain times
  3. I attempt to cover the shortfall in network hash rate with two different scenarios (shown below).
  4. I assume we hold all coins until the end of the contract, and assign a value to the portfolio based on $USD
  5. I do not run any scenarios of converting a currency into another currency
  6. I do not account for any significant changes to the underlying algorithm, such as the "Casper" Ethereum update (see 'THE DIFFICULTY BOMB' below)
Obviously any slight change could drastically alter these assumptions, but let's take a look at the different scenarios.

THE SCENARIOS

Description of Scenarios
Instead of calculating just a base scenario (which every other calculator on the web does) I wanted to come up with different scenarios to get an idea of what could be.
  1. Base - Assume no change in price or network hashrate for the duration of the contract
  2. Median - Run a full 1,000 trial simulation of prices and network hash rate, and use the median values for each
  3. Conservative - The same as Median, but instead use a price forecast that is 1 standard deviation below the median price
  4. Aggressive - The same as Median, but instead use a price forecast that is 1 standard deviation above the median price

APIs USED

  1. Spreadstreet Google Sheets Add-in
  2. Bitfinex API - To pull in historical data for each currency
  3. WhatToMine API - For nethash statistics
  4. CoinMarketCap - Updated prices

ETHEREUM

The only way to utilize Ethereum is with the product from mining.
But this shortchanges the additional value of mining Ether. It is also absolutely required for securing the Ethereum network as it creates, verifies, publishes, and propagates blocks in the blockchain.
The overall term "Ethereum Mining" is the process of mining Ether. Ether is an absolute essential, as it serves as fuel for the smooth running of the Ethereum platform.
Ether is used as an incentive to motivate developers to create top notch applications.

THE DIFFICULTY BOMB

Sometime in the future (we can't be certain when), ethereum will likely switch from its proof-of-work consensus algorithm to Casper, a proof-of-stake system its developers are now in the throes of completing.
From Blockonomi:
As opposed to the PoW consensus protocol, the PoS protocol achieves consensus through stakers—sometimes referred to as minters, too—who “stake” their coins by locking them down in specialized wallets.
With these stakers at work, mining will become redundant, meaning the Ethereum network post-Casper will rely on stakers and staking pools instead of miners for its operability.
Genesis Mining has a prelim plan in place for this scenario:
The Ethererum Mining plans will run for a maximum of 24 months, however, should Ethereum (“ETH”) switch to proof-of-stake before the end of the term, we will use the leased hardware on a best-effort basis to mine the most profitable coin with that hardware for you.
Very simply put, this changes the economics of contract profitability significantly. We are going to ignore that update for now, but it may make sense to stay away from the contracts in the short-term.

THE CONTRACTS

Ethereum Mining Contracts Comparison

ONE-YEAR PRICE FORECAST

Ethereum One Year Price Simulation
Here we can see one of 1,000 price simulations run to inform our forecast for the Median, Conservative, and Aggressive scenarios.
*Why is the price so high? This is what happens when you have a volatile currency in a simulation that does not have changes in said volatility. When a currency can move 20% in one day, it is not uncommon to see price movements like this. I mean, shit, Ethereum grew 25x in one year.

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

Ethereum Profit and ROI Comparison

VERDICT

Base performance ranges from 30% to 39% ROI, and is higher than the Median scenario by ~10%.
The conservative scenario shows a loss of between 59-62%, and the aggressive scenario shows a gain between 318% and 347%.
Difficulty bomb in the near-future presents tremendous uncertainty.

MONERO

From Cryptocompare:
Monero (XMR) is a Cryptonote algorithm based cryptocurrency, it relies on Ring Signatures in order to provide a certain degree of privacy when making a transaction. Monero is a Proof of Work cryptocurrency that can be mined with computational power from a CPU or GPU. There are currently no ASICs for Monero, which means that anyone with a computer can mine it.

THE CONTRACTS

Monero Mining Contracts Comparison

ONE-YEAR PRICE FORECAST

MoneroOne Year Price Simulation
We run the same Monte Carlo simulation to inform our forecast for the Median, Conservative, and Aggressive scenarios.
Why is the price so high? See Ethereum up above.
How is it possible for the "Conservative" scenario to be higher than the base price? Good question, and i'm glad you brought it up. The Monero currency has been not only really volatile, but drifting upwards at a pretty high rate.
The results are also being skewed by a recent uptick on November 6th where the price jumped by ~18%.
This may represent an opportunity for contract investment, but more analysis is needed.

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

Monero Profit and ROI Comparison

VERDICT

Base performance ranges from 87% to 95% ROI, with performance in the Median scenario lower by 5-6%.
The conservative scenario shows a loss of between 63-64%, and the aggressive scenario shows a gain between 795% and 832%.
To reiterate, the aggressive scenario is very much influenced by the recent uptick in volatility, so be weary of those high numbers.

ZCASH

ZCash uses Equihash as an hashing algorithm, which is an asymmetric memory-hard PoW algorithm based on the generalized birthday problem (I don't know what the hell this means, but it sounds fancy).
It relies on high RAM requirements to bottleneck the generation of proofs and making ASIC development unfeasible, much like Ethereum.

THE CONTRACTS

Zcash Mining Contracts Comparison

ONE-YEAR PRICE FORECAST

Zcash One Year Price Simulation
Here we can see one of 1,000 price simulations run to inform our forecast for the Median, Conservative, and Aggressive scenarios.
*Why is the price so high? See: Ethereum up above.

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

Zcash Profit and ROI Comparison

VERDICT

Base performance ranges from 51% to 65% ROI, and surprisingly lags the Median scenario by 4-6%.
The conservative scenario shows a loss of between 56-60%, and the aggressive scenario shows a gain between 490% and 540%.

CONCLUSION

The initial upfront costs and potential profitability are hidden when investing in hashing power contracts like Genesis Mining.
However with some robust analysis, we can get a better idea of how to assess the potential profitability of a two-year deal.
As we continue to evolve our thinking, better methods and analysis will eventually surface. Hopefully this industry can become a great avenue for side income.
If you want your own copy of the analysis and calculations, you can find it here:
Genesis Mining Profit Calculator
Cheers, and happy hunting!

RELATED POSTS

How to Create an Ethereum Mining Calculator from Start to Finish
10 Statistical Price Predictions for 10 Cryptocurrencies
Bitcoin Madness: How to Simulate Bitcoin Prices in Google Sheets

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

John Young is the founder of Spreadstreet.io, former Financial Analyst for a big-ass company, and runner-up in the 6th grade spelling bee. He would have invested in Google if he knew about it...and had any money.
He is the author of the Spreadstreet blog, which has over 3 readers (not a typo). He hopes to hit 10, but honestly writing is a lot of work.
submitted by 1kexperimentdotcom to EtherMining [link] [comments]

Cosmos Hub ATOM Token and the commonly misunderstood staking token - Yield does not equal Profit

Cosmos Hub ATOM Token and the commonly misunderstood staking token - Yield does not equal Profit
This is part three where we look at the ATOM token and general misconceptions around staking tokens. Part one can be found here and part Two can be found here

The ATOM token

I often see a lot of confusion around what the ATOM token is used for, so let me clarify:
  • The ATOM token is NOT used for all staking / transactions across the entire Cosmos Ecosystem. It is specific to only the Cosmos Hub. The Cosmos hub is one of many hubs / zones within the Cosmos Ecosystem. There are other hubs live today such as IRIS (which has its own token IRIS) and Sentinel due to launch later this month (which has its own token SENT). Each Zone will also have its own token to incentivise validators to secure their zone.
  • Transactions fees paid for the Cosmos Hub Do Not have to be paid using ATOM, a wide selection of different tokens will be able to be used to pay transaction fees such as BTC, ETH etc. The incentive for staking is that you will receive a proportion of these fees in the various currencies depending on the number of ATOMs staked.
  • It is NOT a currency, nor your normal token that you invest in and just HODL on your ledger. It is a staking token used to secure the Cosmos Hub. ATOM is hyper inflationary (which rewards those that stake the token to provide security to the Cosmos Hub and punishes those that don’t stake via decrease in value per ATOM via inflation.
  • The Top 100 Validators which stake the most atoms are selected for validating / creating new transactions
ATOMs are like ASICs, just as ASICs are a piece of capital you need in order to mine POW chains like Bitcoin, ATOMs are a piece of capital that you need in order to stake on the cosmos hub and earn transaction fees going through that hub. If a lot of ASICs are already in use it is very difficult to attack the network and similarly if a lot of ATOMs are staked, then it is very difficult for someone to buy a large portion of the ATOMs to attack the network. You can read the document explaining the token by the team here as well as the video below (time stamped from 44:30) as well as here

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hREydu6Llac&t=2670s

Staking Tokens

Staking tokens are very commonly misunderstood by people, they assume its a passive income where they can earn 10–20% for doing nothing but staking their tokens. Rewards are created by minting new tokens via Inflation, this depreciates the asset of each token by increasing total supply of the tokens. To counter the negative effect of inflation, you can stake your tokens to earn a reward which is greater than the inflation increases. If there was 20% inflation and 100% of the tokens were staked, then there would be no rewards. It’s would just be like projects increased their total supply when doing coin swaps such as VEN going to VET where they increased the total supply of the tokens and everyone received the same proportion. Those that do not stake are punished as they are not receiving the % increase in new supply and so their proportion is diluted.
There are many examples of some version of the following: “Earn a 15% yield per annum when you stake on x network!” This is at best misleading and at worst potentially fraudulent depending on the jurisdiction where these claims are being made. It causes token holders to evaluate and hold PoS tokens on a basis that isn’t applicable or relevant. Even worse, using these words incorrectly can lead regulators to draw unnecessary negative conclusions about how to tax and regulate these networks/tokens: “If you are calling it yield then it should be taxed as income…” Staking rewards — and the possibility of slashing — are a set of incentives that encourage token holders and validators to secure a PoS blockchain. In return, they maintain or grow their relative share of token holdings in the network. Staking creates the “skin in the game” necessary for good behavior such as running nodes in the network and discouraging bad behaviors like failing to remain online or double signing. Staking rewards do NOT exist to provide an income stream to token holders. Think instead, “by staking I can increase my network participation (ownership if you like) by 0.3% over the following year” or “if I do not stake, my relative participation/ownership in the network will be diluted by 1.5% over the next 12 months”. The economic rationale for staking a PoS token is not to receive “yield” (it doesn’t exist) but because you believe that by doing so you will be growing your relative interest in the network and also contributing to significant token appreciation.
The above is taken from a great article which can be found here which explains the commonly misunderstood Staking Token and related terms such as Yield and Inflation.

Basic Example of how this works

To see how it works let’s look at a basic example. For simplicity assume there are only 2 Validators, “Validator 1" and “Validator 2" and there is a current total supply of 1000 tokens. 300 tokens are being staked with each Validator, with the validator for each staking 150 tokens and the delegators also staking 150 tokens. 60% of the total supply is staked whilst 40% is not staked.

https://preview.redd.it/en0kuks1deb31.png?width=1100&format=png&auto=webp&s=b8a16460fa277be3f1a7d8000af672573b884f51

Again, to keep it simple rather than do the rewards per block i am just going to use the yearly figures. So, if total supply is 1000 and inflation is set at 20% then there will be 200 tokens to be minted over a year to be used for rewards and added to the total supply. So total supply now becomes 1200 and the 200 tokens are distributed according to the diagram below (and using the commission / staking values in the diagram above)

https://preview.redd.it/5iwj4bo3deb31.png?width=2640&format=png&auto=webp&s=9519f8d171e78b2a255644a07e3887b8ee15ab9c
So now that the 200 tokens have been minted the total supply has now increased to 1200 and we can compare how the proportions of supply have changed.
The users that didn’t stake — initially had 40% of the supply, they have been penalized for not staking and now only own 33.33% of the supply. (Note they haven’t had any tokens removed from them it’s because additional tokens have been minted and they haven’t received a proportion of them by not staking.) — a decrease of 6.66%
Delegator using validator charging 20% commission — Initially had 15% of the supply and now has 15.84% of the supply — an increase of 0.84%
Validator charging 20% commission — Initially had 15% of the supply now has 17.5% of the supply — an increase of 2.5%
Validator charging 10% commission — Initially had 15% of the supply now has 17.08% of the supply — an increase of 2.08%
Delegator using validator charging 10% commission — Initially had 15% of the supply and now has 16.26% of the supply — an increase of 1.25%

https://preview.redd.it/2s0yutj5deb31.png?width=1100&format=png&auto=webp&s=481e4073b3ea25d9f2919693b94c7863ed44f652
You can see how the users that don’t stake get penalized by not receiving rewards with the increase of additional supply. The proportion of supply that they lose gets transferred to those that stake.

21 Day unbonding period

To protect against a validator attacking the network and then immediately withdrawing his stake, the Cosmos Hub is enforcing a 21-day unbonding period. During this period, staked Atoms do not receive rewards anymore, but slashing is still possible. This means your Atoms are illiquid for 21-days after you decide to stop staking. You will not be able to trade them on an exchange etc until the 21 days have passed. There are however exchanges now looking at offering services where you keep your ATOM on their exchange, and they stake them for you. This has advantages of being able to day trade etc whilst still earning rewards to counter inflation. The downsides are that they normally charge high commission (30%), plus security wise its not great to have everyone leaving their tokens on an exchange as has been proven time and time again. The other potential issue is that it gives the exchanges a lot of voting power over the network if everyone uses them which creates centralisation and may be more inclined to vote on for governance that benefits them. EOS has this issue.
Whale Exchange, Newdex, Hufu, Bigone, and several other exchanges and wallets, have been elected as the top 10 BPs. In the meanwhile, the original supernodes, EOS Newyork, EOS42, EOS Authority, and EOS Canada, all have dropped out the top 21 rankings. Huobi Pool continues to see its dominance. At present, two of the top 5 ranked super nodes belong to one entity: EOSLaomao and Bigone exchanges both belong to the individual Laomao and team. The interests of the two are closely tied, and the strong essentially becomes stronger. And now we are seeing a phenomenon where an overarching number of top BPs are coming from mainland China, and in other words, we are seeing EOS even more centralized than before. Most of the top supernodes currently as of publishing date are either based in China or ran by a Chinese team Brian, the head of the EOS Amsterdam community, also believes that the exchange is considered to be the “leader in the ecosystem”. He is more worried, however, that the supernodes are almost occupied by mainland China nodes, leading to network security vulnerability, centralization and long-term negative PR. This would subsequently bring down the price of the token.
https://globalcoinresearch.com/2019/07/11/the-rising-trend-of-exchanges-participating-as-eos-bps-eos-becoming-even-more-centralized/?source=post_page---------------------------

Slashing

Staking is not without its risks and it’s important to choose a secure and trusted validator or risk having your tokens that are staked slashed. On the 29th June the first validator had all tokens that were staked with them slashed by 5% due to a misconfiguration which caused them to double sign a block. Whilst in this case, the slashing was neither the consequence of an attack on the network nor the result of a compromised validator key, it demonstrates that slashing is real and that validators should carefully design their infrastructure to mitigate the risk of losing their own and their delegators’ funds.

https://preview.redd.it/m0iqeqpddeb31.png?width=542&format=png&auto=webp&s=aaa36fc6a95a4f9f366e8cc7e980343117cb8cca

How to choose which Validator to delegate to?

The first metric I look at when evaluating validators is how much self-bond they have. If they have 30% or higher self-bond, this gives me confidence that they don’t want to get slashed as much as I (delegator) don’t want to get slashed. When a validator has low self-bond (1% or less), it makes me less likely to bond to them because they are playing with other peoples’ money, and there’s less incentive for them to bolster their setups. Many of the top validators are highly visible by making their contributions to the ecosystem known. A lot of them have built useful tools that add to the richness of the Cosmos ecosystem, and thus you recognize their brand through their contribution. For example, you would know about a validator because you’ve used their block explorer. All this of course isn’t telling of the hardness of their setups. This part is hard to verify yourself without going into their data centers and auditing their servers yourself. For now, doing your research on what they’ve got set up as described by their website/content is the best option to understanding what kind of setup they’ve built.
https://medium.com/@huobiwallet/cosmos-ama-on-huobi-wallet-d6b75f6ed492
Tendermint uses Proof of Stake where all validators are known before hand. The current maximum amount of Validators is 100. Validators run a full node for the Cosmos hub and provide its security, as well as being able to vote on Governance about future decisions for the Hub. The 100 Validators which stake the most ATOMs are selected. Currently the minimum amount of ATOM staked to be in the top 100 is 39,047 ATOMs.
The amount of ATOMs staked by a Validator is a combination of ATOM’s that the validator personally holds as well as Delegators, those that rather than run a validator, delegate their stake to another validator and receive a % of their rewards depending on the amount they delegate. There is normally a commision fee that the validator takes as a fee as a % of the rewards received for delegating to them which can normally ranges from 0% to 30% (can see in the picture below). This pays for the equipment, wages etc needed to run a secure validator.
https://preview.redd.it/w7fudoigdeb31.png?width=770&format=png&auto=webp&s=49835b8cb0972090187765a69366a143baadf342
Tendermint requires 2/3 of votes for consensus to be reached. Currently 2/3 of the vote are controlled by the Top 16 Validators (so effectively if these all agree to vote on a proposal then that would be sufficient without the input of the other 84).
If a validator / group of validators control more than 1/3 of the vote then whilst they can’t force any changes through, they can prevent any further proposals from being accepted that they don’t agree with regardless of what other validators vote. So the idea is to have the voting power distributed widely throughout the top 100 for more decentralisation.

Calculating the values for Cosmos

Current Total Supply:

There is no fixed total supply of ATOMs and the total supply will increase each year by between 7% and 20% due to inflation.
https://stargate.cosmos.network/staking/pool
{ "not_bonded_tokens": "71341288426570", "bonded_tokens": "170079253911157" }
Bonded Tokens + Not Bonded Tokens = Total Supply.
The values in the API include 6 decimal places so you need to divide the number by 1,000,000. So to work out the total supply it would be:
(71341288426570 + 170079253911157) / 1,000,000 = 241,420,542.337727‬ ATOM
You then have a minimum of 7% and a maximum of 20% inflation per year on top of that depending on how much has been staked.

Circulating Supply:

The only tokens that are under a vesting period are for All in Bits Inc (AiB, the company doing business as “Tendermint”). They have a total of 23,619,895.81 ATOMs vested which are split into two sets, each subject to a different form of vesting.
The first set consists of 1,777,707 ATOMs allocated to 44 addresses owned by AiB founders, contractors, and employees, current and past. These atoms are non-transferable for 12 months, but can be used for staking and governance. These will become unlocked on the 13th March 2020.
The remaining set of AiBs atoms are held in an AiB multisig and vest continuously starting 2 months after genesis. This is a total of 21,842,188.81 ATOMs.
Each month 992,826.76 of these are released on the 13th (Starting May 13th 2019 and finishing on March 13th 2021.
So Circulating Supply = Total Supply — (Amount Vested by AIB)
Circulating Supply = 241,039,982.546951 — (1,777,707– (21,842,188.81 — (3 x 992,826.76)) (represents 3 months which have been released so far)
Circulating Supply = 220,398,567.016951 ATOMs
Current Market Cap: $872,778,325.39

How to work out Profit from Staking

The Annual reward yield is currently 10.19 % which can be seen from sites such as here
This is the bit where people get confused with staking. They see 10.19 % reward and think easy money, passive income etc. What you need to understand is that these rewards are from new ATOMs being minted and added to the supply via inflation. And so with a higher supply the value of each ATOM is worth less.

Calculate effective reward rate in ATOMs

((100% — Commission Rate%) * Yield Rate) — Inflation
So if you delegate with a validator which charges 20% commission
It would be (0.8 * 10.19) — 7.66 = 0.492% a year in ATOMs

Calculate effective profit in FIAT terms

ATOMs hasn’t been trading for a full year but if we take the first value in CMC which is $6.44 and is currently $3.95 which is a decrease of 38.66% per ATOM. The yearly reward yield is 10.19% so in profit terms its 10.19–38.66 = -28.47%
Profit in USD Terms = 10.19–38.66 = a loss of 28.47% in USD

Calculate effective profit in BTC terms

At the start of trading each ATOM was worth 0.00164490 satoshis, as of the time of this writing they are now 0.00037155 satoshis which is a decrease of 77.41%
Profit in BTC terms = Reward Rate + Change in Price per ATOM in BTC over year
Profit in BTC Terms = 10.19–77.41 = a loss of 67.22 % in BTC
Note that these calculations do not include transaction costs for traffic going through the Hub. Once IBC is released (minimum viable product version is supposed to be at the end of this year, so i would estimate mid next year for full feature version to be released), adoption of the ecosystem will increase and zones will be transferring between each other over hubs then additional revenue is earned via transaction fees of other tokens.
This site you can see the correct value for Total Supply, % Bonded and Inflation Rate https://www.mintscan.io/
Be warned there are some other sites such as https://stakingrewards.com/asset/atom which show incorrect values (for example they say the staking ratio is currently 88.06% which is incorrect and skews the figures for rewards. Mintscan is accurate and the API site that i listed before is direct from the Cosmos Official website so is correct.
https://medium.com/@CryptoSeq/cosmos-atom-token-and-the-commonly-misunderstood-staking-tokens-part-three-958c295c5b78
submitted by xSeq22x to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The Next Level of Crypto Adoption: Bank Teaches Clients About Bitcoin

The Next Level of Crypto Adoption: Bank Teaches Clients About Bitcoin
One German bank has an original way to teach its clients about the world’s most popular cryptocurrency, Bitcoin (BTC). It needs only two old-school things to accomplish this: a pen and a paper.
https://preview.redd.it/m1q7wlfre3x31.jpg?width=1000&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=ccb8974d644b3ed45a10d7e66386153d28ef3890
Recently, Cryptonews.com wrote about the Bitcoin-bullish report published by German bank Bayern LB. We’ve had a chance to talk with the author of the September 2019 report, Senior Economist and FX Analyst in the research team of Bayern LB, Manuel Andersch.
Andersch told us that “’crypto’ is a rather meaningless word” to the Economic Research Department (which is the part of the bank looking into BTC), as the Department is exclusively interested in Bitcoin as an alternative monetary system, but also in the products and additional layers that are built on top of BTC as the base layer, such as the Lightning Network.
“There is a constant interest on the client side to learn more about Bitcoin,” the economist told us. These are the bank’s corporate and institutional clients that want to learn the basics of Bitcoin. This interest prompted the research team to create “a very newbie-friendly workshop,” aimed both at newcomers and those who want to expand their theoretical knowledge with an intuitive and practical experience,” the analyst said. Interestingly, the format of the interactive workshop, aptly called 'The Bitcoin Experience,’ allows for “a mixture of explanations and interactive simulation of the Bitcoin network” to be used in order to explain to the newcomers the basic functionality of Bitcoin – with pen and paper only.
“It’s always fun and it has helped many to understand the basic underpinnings of Bitcoin,” says Andersch, further explaining how the workshop actually works. The participants perform proof of work mining, with prime factorization as the “work,” and they create a blockchain with pieces of paper that relate to each other. They are also faced with a challenge on how to find a consensus about the state of this database in a decentralized network of participants (where nodes are bar tables). “In order to illustrate the economic incentives of the Bitcoin system, there are also mining rewards,” says Andersch.
Pieces of papers with A-Z letters on it are used as transactions, and these circulate in the room for the nodes to validate them according to established rules based on colors. In order to make a calculation for the proof of work, the participants map from letters to numbers based on the number of the letter in the alphabet (e.g. A = 1, G = 7). After five transactions, a block is full and “every node can start with the proof of work puzzle, in order to be THE node that can present its block as the new valid block to rest of the network.”
Andersch explains that the proof of work task is simply to perform prime factorization to the sum of the transactions (if it is not the genesis block to the sum of the transactions plus some number from the previous block). Smartphones are not really allowed when calculating the prime factors.
“The nice thing is that you can explain a lot using prime factorization,” the economist says, such as:
  • Difficulty adjustment (simply making the number a participant has to factorize larger)
  • ASIC miners and their implications (smartphones are allowed at this point)
  • It is “uncomfortable” enough to show the cost side
  • As all calculations are linked to previous block’s calculations, participants quickly understand that changing something implies huge costs (a participant would have to do all the prime factorizations again).
submitted by CryptoHamstereu to u/CryptoHamstereu [link] [comments]

The Problem with PoW

The Problem with PoW
Miners have always had it rough..
"Frustrated Miners"

The Problem with PoW
(and what is being done to solve it)

Proof of Work (PoW) is one of the most commonly used consensus mechanisms entrusted to secure and validate many of today’s most successful cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin being one. Battle-hardened and having weathered the test of time, Bitcoin has demonstrated the undeniable strength and reliability of the PoW consensus model through sheer market saturation, and of course, its persistency.
In addition to the cost of powerful computing hardware, miners prove that they are benefiting the network by expending energy in the form of electricity, by solving and hashing away complex math problems on their computers, utilizing any suitable tools that they have at their disposal. The mathematics involved in securing proof of work revolve around unique algorithms, each with their own benefits and vulnerabilities, and can require different software/hardware to mine depending on the coin.
Because each block has a unique and entirely random hash, or “puzzle” to solve, the “work” has to be performed for each block individually and the difficulty of the problem can be increased as the speed at which blocks are solved increases.

Hashrates and Hardware Types

While proof of work is an effective means of securing a blockchain, it inherently promotes competition amongst miners seeking higher and higher hashrates due to the rewards earned by the node who wins the right to add the next block. In turn, these higher hash rates benefit the blockchain, providing better security when it’s a result of a well distributed/decentralized network of miners.
When Bitcoin first launched its genesis block, it was mined exclusively by CPUs. Over the years, various programmers and developers have devised newer, faster, and more energy efficient ways to generate higher hashrates; some by perfecting the software end of things, and others, when the incentives are great enough, create expensive specialized hardware such as ASICs (application-specific integrated circuit). With the express purpose of extracting every last bit of hashing power, efficiency being paramount, ASICs are stripped down, bare minimum, hardware representations of a specific coin’s algorithm.
This gives ASICS a massive advantage in terms of raw hashing power and also in terms of energy consumption against CPUs/GPUs, but with significant drawbacks of being very expensive to design/manufacture, translating to a high economic barrier for the casual miner. Due to the fact that they are virtual hardware representations of a single targeted algorithm, this means that if a project decides to fork and change algorithms suddenly, your powerful brand-new ASIC becomes a very expensive paperweight. The high costs in developing and manufacturing ASICs and the associated risks involved, make them unfit for mass adoption at this time.
Somewhere on the high end, in the vast hashrate expanse created between GPU and ASIC, sits the FPGA (field programmable gate array). FPGAs are basically ASICs that make some compromises with efficiency in order to have more flexibility, namely they are reprogrammable and often used in the “field” to test an algorithm before implementing it in an ASIC. As a precursor to the ASIC, FPGAs are somewhat similar to GPUs in their flexibility, but require advanced programming skills and, like ASICs, are expensive and still fairly uncommon.

2 Guys 1 ASIC

One of the issues with proof of work incentivizing the pursuit of higher hashrates is in how the network calculates block reward coinbase payouts and rewards miners based on the work that they have submitted. If a coin generated, say a block a minute, and this is a constant, then what happens if more miners jump on a network and do more work? The network cannot pay out more than 1 block reward per 1 minute, and so a difficulty mechanism is used to maintain balance. The difficulty will scale up and down in response to the overall nethash, so if many miners join the network, or extremely high hashing devices such as ASICs or FPGAs jump on, the network will respond accordingly, using the difficulty mechanism to make the problems harder, effectively giving an edge to hardware that can solve them faster, balancing the network. This not only maintains the block a minute reward but it has the added side-effect of energy requirements that scale up with network adoption.
Imagine, for example, if one miner gets on a network all alone with a CPU doing 50 MH/s and is getting all 100 coins that can possibly be paid out in a day. Then, if another miner jumps on the network with the same CPU, each miner would receive 50 coins in a day instead of 100 since they are splitting the required work evenly, despite the fact that the net electrical output has doubled along with the work. Electricity costs miner’s money and is a factor in driving up coin price along with adoption, and since more people are now mining, the coin is less centralized. Now let’s say a large corporation has found it profitable to manufacture an ASIC for this coin, knowing they will make their money back mining it or selling the units to professionals. They join the network doing 900 MH/s and will be pulling in 90 coins a day, while the two guys with their CPUs each get 5 now. Those two guys aren’t very happy, but the corporation is. Not only does this negatively affect the miners, it compromises the security of the entire network by centralizing the coin supply and hashrate, opening the doors to double spends and 51% attacks from potential malicious actors. Uncertainty of motives and questionable validity in a distributed ledger do not mix.
When technology advances in a field, it is usually applauded and welcomed with open arms, but in the world of crypto things can work quite differently. One of the glaring flaws in the current model and the advent of specialized hardware is that it’s never ending. Suppose the two men from the rather extreme example above took out a loan to get themselves that ASIC they heard about that can get them 90 coins a day? When they join the other ASIC on the network, the difficulty adjusts to keep daily payouts consistent at 100, and they will each receive only 33 coins instead of 90 since the reward is now being split three ways. Now what happens if a better ASIC is released by that corporation? Hopefully, those two guys were able to pay off their loans and sell their old ASICs before they became obsolete.
This system, as it stands now, only perpetuates a never ending hashrate arms race in which the weapons of choice are usually a combination of efficiency, economics, profitability and in some cases control.

Implications of Centralization

This brings us to another big concern with expensive specialized hardware: the risk of centralization. Because they are so expensive and inaccessible to the casual miner, ASICs and FPGAs predominantly remain limited to a select few. Centralization occurs when one small group or a single entity controls the vast majority hash power and, as a result, coin supply and is able to exert its influence to manipulate the market or in some cases, the network itself (usually the case of dishonest nodes or bad actors).
This is entirely antithetical of what cryptocurrency was born of, and since its inception many concerted efforts have been made to avoid centralization at all costs. An entity in control of a centralized coin would have the power to manipulate the price, and having a centralized hashrate would enable them to affect network usability, reliability, and even perform double spends leading to the demise of a coin, among other things.
The world of crypto is a strange new place, with rapidly growing advancements across many fields, economies, and boarders, leaving plenty of room for improvement; while it may feel like a never-ending game of catch up, there are many talented developers and programmers working around the clock to bring us all more sustainable solutions.

The Rise of FPGAs

With the recent implementation of the commonly used coding language C++, and due to their overall flexibility, FPGAs are becoming somewhat more common, especially in larger farms and in industrial setting; but they still remain primarily out of the hands of most mining enthusiasts and almost unheard of to the average hobby miner. Things appear to be changing though, one example of which I’ll discuss below, and it is thought by some, that soon we will see a day when mining with a CPU or GPU just won’t cut it any longer, and the market will be dominated by FPGAs and specialized ASICs, bringing with them efficiency gains for proof of work, while also carelessly leading us all towards the next round of spending.
A perfect real-world example of the effect specialized hardware has had on the crypto-community was recently discovered involving a fairly new project called VerusCoin and a fairly new, relatively more economically accessible FPGA. The FPGA is designed to target specific alt-coins whose algo’s do not require RAM overhead. It was discovered the company had released a new algorithm, kept secret from the public, which could effectively mine Verus at 20x the speed of GPUs, which were the next fastest hardware types mining on the Verus network.
Unfortunately this was done with a deliberately secret approach, calling the Verus algorithm “Algo1” and encouraging owners of the FPGA to never speak of the algorithm in public channels, admonishing a user when they did let the cat out of the bag. The problem with this business model is that it is parasitic in nature. In an ecosystem where advancements can benefit the entire crypto community, this sort of secret mining approach also does not support the philosophies set forth by the Bitcoin or subsequent open source and decentralization movements.
Although this was not done in the spirit of open source, it does hint to an important step in hardware innovation where we could see more efficient specialized systems within reach of the casual miner. The FPGA requires unique sets of data called a bitstream in order to be able to recognize each individual coin’s algorithm and mine them. Because it’s reprogrammable, with the support of a strong development team creating such bitstreams, the miner doesn’t end up with a brick if an algorithm changes.

All is not lost thanks to.. um.. Technology?

Shortly after discovering FPGAs on the network, the Verus developers quickly designed, tested, and implemented a new, much more complex and improved algorithm via a fork that enabled Verus to transition smoothly from VerusHash 1.0 to VerusHash 2.0 at block 310,000. Since the fork, VerusHash 2.0 has demonstrated doing exactly what it was designed for- equalizing hardware performance relative to the device being used while enabling CPUs (the most widely available “ASICs”) to mine side by side with GPUs, at a profit and it appears this will also apply to other specialized hardware. This is something no other project has been able to do until now. Rather than pursue the folly of so many other projects before it- attempting to be “ASIC proof”, Verus effectively achieved and presents to the world an entirely new model of “hardware homogeny”. As the late, great, Bruce Lee once said- “Don’t get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water.”
In the design of VerusHash 2.0, Verus has shown it doesn’t resist progress like so many other new algorithms try to do, it embraces change and adapts to it in the way that water becomes whatever vessel it inhabits. This new approach- an industry first- could very well become an industry standard and in doing so, would usher in a new age for proof of work based coins. VerusHash 2.0 has the potential to correct the single largest design flaw in the proof of work consensus mechanism- the ever expanding monetary and energy requirements that have plagued PoW based projects since the inception of the consensus mechanism. Verus also solves another major issue of coin and net hash centralization by enabling legitimate CPU mining, offering greater coin and hashrate distribution.
Digging a bit deeper it turns out the Verus development team are no rookies. The lead developer Michael F Toutonghi has spent decades in the field programming and is a former Vice President and Technical Fellow at Microsoft, recognized founder and architect of Microsoft's .Net platform, ex-Technical Fellow of Microsoft's advertising platform, ex-CTO, Parallels Corporation, and an experienced distributed computing and machine learning architect. The project he helped create employs and makes use of a diverse myriad of technologies and security features to form one of the most advanced and secure cryptocurrency to date. A brief description of what makes VerusCoin special quoted from a community member-
"Verus has a unique and new consensus algorithm called Proof of Power which is a 50% PoW/50% PoS algorithm that solves theoretical weaknesses in other PoS systems (Nothing at Stake problem for example) and is provably immune to 51% hash attacks. With this, Verus uses the new hash algorithm, VerusHash 2.0. VerusHash 2.0 is designed to better equalize mining across all hardware platforms, while favoring the latest CPUs over older types, which is also one defense against the centralizing potential of botnets. Unlike past efforts to equalize hardware hash-rates across different hardware types, VerusHash 2.0 explicitly enables CPUs to gain even more power relative to GPUs and FPGAs, enabling the most decentralizing hardware, CPUs (due to their virtually complete market penetration), to stay relevant as miners for the indefinite future. As for anonymity, Verus is not a "forced private", allowing for both transparent and shielded (private) transactions...and private messages as well"

If other projects can learn from this and adopt a similar approach or continue to innovate with new ideas, it could mean an end to all the doom and gloom predictions that CPU and GPU mining are dead, offering a much needed reprieve and an alternative to miners who have been faced with the difficult decision of either pulling the plug and shutting down shop or breaking down their rigs to sell off parts and buy new, more expensive hardware…and in so doing present an overall unprecedented level of decentralization not yet seen in cryptocurrency.
Technological advancements led us to the world of secure digital currencies and the progress being made with hardware efficiencies is indisputably beneficial to us all. ASICs and FPGAs aren’t inherently bad, and there are ways in which they could be made more affordable and available for mass distribution. More than anything, it is important that we work together as communities to find solutions that can benefit us all for the long term.

In an ever changing world where it may be easy to lose sight of the real accomplishments that brought us to this point one thing is certain, cryptocurrency is here to stay and the projects that are doing something to solve the current problems in the proof of work consensus mechanism will be the ones that lead us toward our collective vision of a better world- not just for the world of crypto but for each and every one of us.
submitted by Godballz to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining: Everything you need to know

Bitcoin mining is a term that everyone in the cryptocurrency and even many outsiders are familiar with. This is a process performed by high-powered computers (also known as nodes), which solve complicated computational math problems.
While distinct, there are certain similarities between bitcoin mining and actual mining for precious metals such as gold, for example. Both processes are carried out with the intention to earn a reward.
Furthermore, bitcoins actually exist in the bitcoin protocol but they haven’t been brought out yet – just as gold exists in the ground but it hasn’t been mined yet.
But the aim of bitcoin mining is, however, twofold. For once, when the above-mentioned high-powered computer or any other type of mining hardware, for that matter, successfully solves the complex math problem on the network of Bitcoin, they produce a new bitcoin.
On the other hand, by solving the computational math problems, bitcoin miners are actually making the payment network a secure through the proof-of-work consensus algorithm.

WHY IS BITCOIN MINING NECESSARY?

In order to break down bitcoin mining, there are a few important considerations that need to be taken into account.
Consumers tend to trust different types of printed fiat currencies because they are backed by central banks. In the US, for instance, this is the Federal Reserve. This is even true for digital payments made with fiat currencies.
Bitcoin, however, is not regulated by any central authority. It can be said that it is ‘backed’ by the computing power, which secures the network. This vast network of computers and mining hardware records transactions and make sure that they are accurate.
Unlike central authorities, however, bitcoin miners are spread throughout the entire world and record the transactional information on a public ledger available to anyone. This ledger can be viewed using a block explorer and there are many different websites that provide this service.
In other words, bitcoin mining is necessary for two different reasons – first, it is needed to create new bitcoin and second, it’s needed to confirm the transactional information. So, in theory, if you don’t want to buy Bitcoin, you can earn it through mining. Whether or not that’s efficient for you as an individual miner, however, is a different story.

HOW DOES BITCOIN MINING WORK?

In order for a bitcoin miner to get block rewards, there are two conditions which need to be met. First, the miner needs to confirm a certain amount of transactions and second, which is the trickiest part, solve a complex computational math problem.
Put simply, if that’s at all possible, each miner is competing with all of the others to come up with a 64-digit hexadecimal number which is referred to as a “hash” which is less than or equal to the hash which is targeted. In other words, the computer will be spitting out different hashes at a certain rate per second guessing all of the possible 64-digit numbers until they reach the correct solution.
Therefore, computational power is essential – the more powerful your mining equipment, the larger hash rate per second you’d be able to achieve. This is why the Bitcoin mining hardware is particularly important. Naturally, the cost of mining would be based on a the operation costs such as electricity, internet connection, hardware maintenance, and so forth.
This is the main reason for which back in 2013 bitcoin miners started to use machines which were specifically designed for mining cryptocurrencies. These are called Application-Specific Integrated Circuits or ASIC mining, for short. ASIC mining devices can cost a serious amount of money but are more efficient than traditional computers.
There are a few important things to be considered when it comes to BTC mining. These are some of its pillar components, so to speak.
  1. Blocks
One of the things to be aware of in the world of Bitcoin mining is blocks. Transaction data is recorded in files which are called blocks. Think of it as a page from your city’s recordbook. Blocks are organized into a chain in chronological order – hence, blockchain. New transactions, as they are being confirmed by miners, go into new blocks, with each new block is being added to the end of the chain. This is why blockchain is also referred to as records of blocks.
  1. Block Rewards
Is Bitcoin mining profitable? This is probably the most commonly asked question. Unfortunately, there is no one answer. Block rewards are what miners compete for. Other cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin Cash, for instance, also have their own block rewards which differ from those of Bitcoin.
At inception, every single bitcoin block reward was worth 50 BTC. However, the protocol works in a way where the block reward is being halved after 210,000 blocks have been discovered. This takes roughly around four years to complete. As of July 9th, 2016, the reward for discovering one block is 12.5 BTC.
So is Bitcoin mining profitable? It depends. One would have to calculate the current block reward based on the current prices and compare that to the cost of mining, which varies from miner to miner.
It’s worth noting that the reward for successful Bitcoin miners will drop once again in May 2020 and it will decrease to 6.25 BTC per block from the current 12.5.
  1. Hash Rate
To put it in the most basic terms, hash rate represents the speed at which bitcoin mining hardware can guess the correct hash. Therefore, the faster your hash rate is the higher the chances of discovering the new block you have. BTC mining has become highly competitive and, as such, you need to consider getting powerful bitcoin mining hardware. Individual miners, can, on the other hand, take advantage of cloud mining or mine a coin with lower difficulty, but more on that later.
  1. Difficulty
The difficulty of bitcoin mining is adjusted frequently in order to maintain an average time of about 10 minutes to process a block. The rate is recalculated every 2,016 blocks.
In case you wonder why ten minutes – it’s because bitcoin developers have decided that this is the time needed for a steady and diminishing flow of producing new coins.

WHAT IS A MINING POOL

When it comes to cryptocurrency mining, a mining pool is the combined resources by miners who are sharing their overall computational power over a network in order to split the reward equally based on the amount of work that they have contributed to discovering a new block.
A “share” would be awarded to each member of the mining pool who manages to present a valid partial proof of his work. Mining pools became popular as the difficulty of bitcoin mining increased over time and when it became apparent that individual miners could no longer compete with bigger pools and large-scale mining operations.

WHAT IS CLOUD MINING

Cloud mining, on the other hand, is what allows individual miners to participate in the process without having to purchase particularly expensive bitcoin mining hardware.
If you want to take part in BTC mining but you don’t want to spend the time and resources to get powerful machines, you can use shared processing power provided by remote data centers. The only thing you’d need is a home computer. Generally, there are three types of cloud mining that you can take advantage of. These include:
  1. Hosted Mining
You can lease a mining machine which is hosted by the provider.
  1. Virtual Hosted Mining
This is a method which would require you to create a virtual private server and after that install your own mining software.
  1. Lease Hash Power
Cloud mining also allows you to lease a certain amount of hash power without having the best bitcoin mining hardware. This is likely to be the most popular method of all. Most of the providers offer comprehensive calculators that you can take advantage of to determine the current profitability based on the resources you are ready to spend.
However, it’s important to pay special attention when it comes to cloud mining as there are fraudulent service providers. It’s crucial to make proper and in-depth due-diligence, especially if you intend to lease hash power. One of the largest cloud Bitcoin mining companies out there is Genesis Mining.

ENERGY CONSUMPTION: THINGS TO BE AWARE OF

Mining bitcoin is intentionally designed to be energy intensive. The computational power needed to solve the abovementioned complex math problems requires a lot of electricity to power up the specialized mining hardware.
On the flipside, it requires even more resources to attack the network than to defend it, making Bitcoin the most secure blockchain today.
In fact, there is an entire pseudo-environmentalist brigade which aims to have the regular user believe that Bitcoin mining would somehow be the death of the planet. A lot of their arguments revolve around the fact that large data centers used for carrying out the math computations use tremendous amount of electricity. However, Bitcoinist recently outlined three reasons for which this rhetoric is complete nonsense.
According to clean energy researcher Katrina Kelly-Pitou, the entire debate on the overall electricity consumption by bitcoin mining facilities is headed in the wrong direction. The research outlines that electricity consumption can increase while, at the same time, have minimal impact on the environment. This is because those facilities gradually begin to use more efficient, sources of energy which are renewable. Not only does this make mining more profitable, but it also lowers the impact on the environment. The researcher also outlined that banks use three times more electricity than Bitcoin’s network.
What is more, a brand new report concluded that 80 percent of Bitcoin mining is running on renewable energy. This is unsurprising since miners are naturally incentivized to seek the cheapest and cleanest sources of energy, many of which are renewables such as hydroelectricity (e.g. Iceland).
If you’re worried about Bitcoin consuming too much energy, you might want to think twice about lighting up the Christmas lights this year. That’s right – the lights that American consumers alone use to decorate their homes for the occasion make up a gigantic 6.63 billion kilowatt hours of electricity consumption every single year. That’s more than the entire national energy consumptions of a lot of the developing countries every year. For example, both Ethiopia and El Salvador used less electricity per year.
However, if you decide to set up a mining rig in your garage, you can most definitely expect a more expensive electricity bill next month.

BEST BITCOIN MINING HARDWARE: THINGS TO CONSIDER

There are a few key parameters to look out for when it comes to choosing the best bitcoin mining hardware. These include:
Naturally, you want to be aware of how much electricity does your miner consume. The lower this number, the better.
As we explained above, the hash rate is essential for bitcoin mining. The larger this number is, the better the machine is, generally.
This measurement accounts for the efficiency of your machine. If this particular number is low, it means that the machine will consume less power for the same amount of work done by the machine.
There is a range of different devices produced by some of the largest companies in the field such as Bitmain Technologies, Canaan Creative, Halong Mining, Innosilicon Technology, and others of the kind.

WHAT ELSE CAN YOU MINE?

Bitcoin is not the only cryptocurrency which can be mined. It’s worth noting, though, that if you are using a specialized cryptocurrency mining hardware you’d have to check the compatible digital currencies, as some of the devices would only allow you to mine selected cryptocurrencies. However, apart from Bitcoin, other popular choices include Bitcoin Cash, Monero, Dogecoin, Litecoin, and so forth.

CONCLUSION

If you managed to make it thus far, you should have a general understanding of the main principles behind bitcoin mining and why it is essential to its network.
At the same time, bitcoin mining represents an alternative method to acquire the digital currency. Of course, if you don’t feel like investing time and efforts into it, let alone designating specialized bitcoin mining hardware, you can always check our detailed guide on to how to buy cryptocurrencies.
We’ve gone in depth on how to buy Bitcoin with Paypal, credit card, debit card, and even with cash. We’ve also covered some of the most popular platforms where you can buy Bitcoin.
Once you’ve done that, you can hop to our comprehensive guide to Bitcoin wallets and determine whether you want a web-based one or an offline, hardware solution instead.
submitted by SwitchKanun to hashflareinfo [link] [comments]

How to Get The Most Profitable Cryptocurrencies to Mine and More in Google Sheets

Original Medium post found here: https://medium.com/spreadstreet/how-to-get-the-most-profitable-cryptocurrencies-to-mine-and-more-in-google-sheets-7b2ad2ebbdcd
One of the most challenging aspects of cryptocurrency mining is finding the most profitable coins to mine.
A few services exist, but nothing beats what the creators of WhatToMine.com have done in a few short months.
The big benefit of the data offered by WhatToMine is a ranking of cryptocurrencies by mining profitability.
The =SS() function, available in Google Sheets as part of the Spreadstreet Google Sheets Add-in, allows the user to pull in two seperate endpoints from the WhatToMine API:
  1. Stats — Used to compare the profitability of all GPU based cryptocurrencies
  2. ASIC — Used to compare the profitability of all ASIC coins

How to install

1. Go to the “Add-ons” menu, and click on “Get add-ons”.

Get Add-ons Menu

2. On the Add-ons panel, search for “Spreadstreet”, click on “+ FREE” to install it.

Click on +Free to install

3. Choose under which account you want to install the Add-on.

Choose Gmail Account

4. Spreadstreet needs to connect to an external API, click on “Allow”.

Click "Allow" when prompted
Note on security: All add-ins within the store go through a review. This is a wonderful security measure, especially in the Crypto industry, which is rife with scams and hacks.

5. Make sure the add-on is activated in your sheet:

  1. Go to Add-on > Spreadstreet > Help
  2. Click on View in store , then click on Manage and check Use in this document:
Click "Use in this document"
Tadaa You are now able to use the =SS() function to pull in all sorts of amazing data within the cryptocurrency space.
Example =SS() usage

How to use for GPU-Mineable Coins

How does WhatToMine calculate profitability for GPU-mineable cryptocurrencies?
What is the calculation missing?
Get most profitable GPU coins
Call the function =SS(“get-stats-whattomine”, true) to return various stats from GPU-minable cryptocurrencies.
Example usage using the GUI:
Open the Add-in

Click “Add” to view the list of available APIs

Click on the “WhatToMine” icon

Click “Stats”

Click “Insert”

Click “Run”. This will paste values into the currently selected Cell, and save that in the main GUI for future retrieval

Example usage using the =SS() Formula:

=QUERY(A:W,”select A, T where T is not null order by T desc”) returns the most profitable GPU-minable cryptocurrencies.

How to use for ASIC-Mineable Coins

How does WhatToMine calculate profitability for ASIC-mineable cryptocurrencies?
What is the calculation missing?
Get most profitable ASIC coins
Call the function =SS(“get-asic-whattomine”, true) to return various stats from ASIC-minable cryptocurrencies.
Example usage:

=QUERY(A:W,”select A, T where T is not null order by T desc”) returns the most profitable GPU-minable cryptocurrencies.

Common issues and how to fix:

  1. Do not keep your sheet open at all time. This will prevent the rates from refreshing. The rates will auto-refresh each time you re-open your sheet.
  2. The add-on may not work right away on other old spreadsheets. You need to do this to activate Spreadstreet: Open the old sheet, click the menu Add-ons / Spreadstreet / Help / View in store, and then click Manage and in the dropdown menu click Use in this document .

RESOURCES

Download the add-in: https://spreadstreet.io/tools/google-sheets-add-in
Help: https://spreadstreet.io/docs
First time install and login: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLjtPR4T2bg
WhatToMine Stats endpoint help: https://spreadstreet.io/knowledge-base/whattomine-api-get-stats-endpoint/

RELATED POSTS

Is Genesis Mining Worth it? A Genesis Mining Profitability Calculator You’ll Actually Use
How to Create an Ethereum Mining Calculator from Start to Finish
10 Statistical Price Predictions for 10 Cryptocurrencies
Bitcoin Madness: How to Simulate Bitcoin Prices in Google Sheets
submitted by 1kexperimentdotcom to gpumining [link] [comments]

Blockchain Dictionary for Newbies

Blockchain Glossary: From A-Z
51% Attack
When more than half of the computing power of a cryptocurrency network is controlled by a single entity or group, this entity or group may issue conflicting transactions to harm the network, should they have the malicious intent to do so.
Address
Cryptocurrency addresses are used to send or receive transactions on the network. An address usually presents itself as a string of alphanumeric characters.
ASIC
Short form for ‘Application Specific Integrated Circuit’. Often compared to GPUs, ASICs are specially made for mining and may offer significant power savings.
Bitcoin
Bitcoin is the first decentralised, open source cryptocurrency that runs on a global peer to peer network, without the need for middlemen and a centralised issuer.
Block
Blocks are packages of data that carry permanently recorded data on the blockchain network.
Blockchain
A blockchain is a shared ledger where transactions are permanently recorded by appending blocks. The blockchain serves as a historical record of all transactions that ever occurred, from the genesis block to the latest block, hence the name blockchain.
Block Explorer
Block explorer is an online tool to view all transactions, past and current, on the blockchain. They provide useful information such as network hash rate and transaction growth.
Block Height
The number of blocks connected on the blockchain.
Block Reward
A form of incentive for the miner who successfully calculated the hash in a block during mining. Verification of transactions on the blockchain generates new coins in the process, and the miner is rewarded a portion of those.
Central Ledger
A ledger maintained by a central agency.
Confirmation
The successful act of hashing a transaction and adding it to the blockchain.
Consensus
Consensus is achieved when all participants of the network agree on the validity of the transactions, ensuring that the ledgers are exact copies of each other.
Cryptocurrency
Also known as tokens, cryptocurrencies are representations of digital assets.
Cryptographic Hash Function
Cryptographic hashes produce a fixed-size and unique hash value from variable-size transaction input. The SHA-256 computational algorithm is an example of a cryptographic hash.
Dapp
A decentralised application (Dapp) is an application that is open source, operates autonomously, has its data stored on a blockchain, incentivised in the form of cryptographic tokens and operates on a protocol that shows proof of value.
DAO
Decentralised Autonomous Organizations can be thought of as corporations that run without any human intervention and surrender all forms of control to an incorruptible set of business rules.
Distributed Ledger
Distributed ledgers are ledgers in which data is stored across a network of decentralized nodes. A distributed ledger does not have to have its own currency and may be permissioned and private.
Distributed Network
A type of network where processing power and data are spread over the nodes rather than having a centralised data centre.
Difficulty
This refers to how easily a data block of transaction information can be mined successfully.
Digital Signature
A digital code generated by public key encryption that is attached to an electronically transmitted document to verify its contents and the sender’s identity.
Double Spending
Double spending occurs when a sum of money is spent more than once.
Ethereum
Ethereum is a blockchain-based decentralised platform for apps that run smart contracts, and is aimed at solving issues associated with censorship, fraud and third party interference.
EVM
The Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM) is a Turing complete virtual machine that allows anyone to execute arbitrary EVM Byte Code. Every Ethereum node runs on the EVM to maintain consensus across the blockchain.
Fork
Forks create an alternate version of the blockchain, leaving two blockchains to run simultaneously on different parts of the network.
Genesis Block
The first or first few blocks of a blockchain.
Hard Fork
A type of fork that renders previously invalid transactions valid, and vice versa. This type of fork requires all nodes and users to upgrade to the latest version of the protocol software.
Hash
The act of performing a hash function on the output data. This is used for confirming coin transactions.
Hash Rate
Measurement of performance for the mining rig is expressed in hashes per second.
Hybrid PoS/PoW
A hybrid PoS/PoW allows for both Proof of Stake and Proof of Work as consensus distribution algorithms on the network. In this method, a balance between miners and voters (holders) may be achieved, creating a system of community-based governance by both insiders (holders) and outsiders (miners).
Mining
Mining is the act of validating blockchain transactions. The necessity of validation warrants an incentive for the miners, usually in the form of coins. In this cryptocurrency boom, mining can be a lucrative business when done properly. By choosing the most efficient and suitable hardware and mining target, mining can produce a stable form of passive income.
Multi-Signature
Multi-signature addresses provide an added layer of security by requiring more than one key to authorize a transaction.
Node
A copy of the ledger operated by a participant of the blockchain network.
Oracles
Oracles work as a bridge between the real world and the blockchain by providing data to the smart contracts.
Peer to Peer
Peer to Peer (P2P) refers to the decentralized interactions between two parties or more in a highly-interconnected network. Participants of a P2P network deal directly with each other through a single mediation point.
Public Address
A public address is the cryptographic hash of a public key. They act as email addresses that can be published anywhere, unlike private keys.
Private Key
A private key is a string of data that allows you to access the tokens in a specific wallet. They act as passwords that are kept hidden from anyone but the owner of the address.
Proof of Stake
A consensus distribution algorithm that rewards earnings based on the number of coins you own or hold. The more you invest in the coin, the more you gain by mining with this protocol.
Proof of Work
A consensus distribution algorithm that requires an active role in mining data blocks, often consuming resources, such as electricity. The more ‘work’ you do or the more computational power you provide, the more coins you are rewarded with.
Scrypt
Scrypt is a type of cryptographic algorithm and is used by Litecoin. Compared to SHA256, this is quicker as it does not use up as much processing time.
SHA-256
SHA-256 is a cryptographic algorithm used by cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin. However, it uses a lot of computing power and processing time, forcing miners to form mining pools to capture gains.
Smart Contracts
Smart contracts encode business rules in a programmable language onto the blockchain and are enforced by the participants of the network.
Soft Fork
A soft fork differs from a hard fork in that only previously valid transactions are made invalid. Since old nodes recognize the new blocks as valid, a soft fork is essentially backward-compatible. This type of fork requires most miners upgrading in order to enforce, while a hard fork requires all nodes to agree on the new version.
Solidity
Solidity is Ethereum’s programming language for developing smart contracts.
Testnet
A test blockchain used by developers to prevent expending assets on the main chain.
Transaction Block
A collection of transactions gathered into a block that can then be hashed and added to the blockchain.
Transaction Fee
All cryptocurrency transactions involve a small transaction fee. These transaction fees add up to account for the block reward that a miner receives when he successfully processes a block.
Turing Complete
Turing complete refers to the ability of a machine to perform calculations that any other programmable computer is capable of. An example of this is the Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM).
Wallet
A file that houses private keys. It usually contains a software client which allows access to view and create transactions on a specific blockchain that the wallet is designed for.
submitted by Tokenberry to NewbieZone [link] [comments]

Canadian cloud mining powerhouse Nuvoo revolutionizes cloud mining industry with a month-to-month contract and 50% cheaper rates!

Nuvoo, the largest cryptocurrency mining company in Canada, is now taking giant strides towards emerging as the world’s leading platform for convenient and profitable cryptocurrency mining. The company has just released a new Bitcoin contract that will completely change the game for the industry, with a month-to-month concept based on a 24-month payment for an open-ended contract.
As one of the world’s most trusted crypto mining companies, Nuvoo proudly announces the release of a new Bitcoin contract that promises to have a significant impact on the global cryptocurrency space. With these new contracts, backed by the latest ASIC technology, Nuvoo has already started offering a low pricing structure to challenge the likes of Genesis, Hashflare, and other competitors. Nuvoo is pleased to say that their Bitcoin mining rates are currently 50% cheaper, including a lower maintenance fee, compared to Genesis Mining.
With the launch of this new contract, Nuvoo becomes the first company ever to offer customers the benefit of making payments in up to 24 installments. For example, someone purchasing a $3000 contract from Nuvoo will enjoy the privilege of paying just $125 each month, spread out over 24 months. This creates an opportunity for Nuvoo customers to get larger contracts for lower monthly payments, and it allows the market to grow in a major way.
With a Bitcoin mining system that is ideally suited for beginners, Nuvoo offers a smart and easy way for crypto hobbyists to take their first steps into the crypto-world. At the same time, their system has been used to great effect by crypto experts and entrepreneurs to operate large-scale mining farms. As part of their rapid diversification drive, Nuvoo will soon be launching their own cryptocurrency exchange.
“We have the most advanced platform to manage cloud mining activity with the most efficient affiliate plan. The time has come for the world to know that Nuvoo is a far more stable crypto mining platform compared to Genesis, tipped by many to be the world’s largest cloud mining company,” said Mr. LeBlanc, the Founder and CEO, Nuvoo. “Now, with our new bitcoin contract in place, our pricing is around 50% less than the price of Genesis mining and the maintenance fee is lower than any competitors’ as a Canadian mining farm.”
Leveraging the excellent infrastructure and favorable climate in Quebec, Canada, Nuvoo currently owns and operates more than ten world-class datacenters catering to thousands of customers around the world. Cryptocurrency enthusiasts have put their trust on Nuvoo because they offer one of the safest and most transparent ecosystems for crypto-miners. In order to provide the best contract prices to customers, they never make any profit on mining equipment. The customers buy fixed hashpower contracts, provided directly from one of the largest state-of-the-art ASIC mining farms owned and operated by Nuvoo.
Unlike other competitors, Nuvoo emphasizes lower mining costs and the use of greener energy. This is possible because a high percentage of electricity in Quebec is generated from hydroelectric dams. The cooling costs are also lower because the region remains significantly cold for a considerable part of the year.
Nuvoo attributes their strong position in the market to the company’s special relationship with energy providers and several municipalities in Quebec, all of whom are key players in managing the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity in the province. In January of this year, Nuvoo was invited to a special event presented by Hydro-Quebec, as a guest panelist in order to represent the blockchain community.
Bitcoin mining contracts from Nuvoo are open-ended, and payouts are generated on a daily basis with the withdrawal limit set at 0.0020 BTC. To provide miners with an idea of the earning potential of each mining plan, there is also an efficient mining calculator on the company’s website provided by Cryptocompare, a neutral third party.
Nuvoo and its parent company are about to launch their own exchange, featuring both fiat-to-crypto and crypto-to-crypto solutions. The company is very excited to finally provide a safe trading ecosystem to their clients.
About Nuvoo:
Nuvoo is a cryptocurrency mining powerhouse that focuses on offering cost-effective solutions to cryptocurrency hobbyists and professionals alike. Their philosophy is to enroll the top leaders in the cryptocurrency industry and to make them available to the community. The company specializes in hosting high-density computer hardware requiring substantial access to both power and cooling.
submitted by SwitchKanun to hashflareinfo [link] [comments]

The Problem with PoW


Miners have always had it rough..
"Frustrated Miners"


The Problem with PoW
(and what is being done to solve it)

Proof of Work (PoW) is one of the most commonly used consensus mechanisms entrusted to secure and validate many of today’s most successful cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin being one. Battle-hardened and having weathered the test of time, Bitcoin has demonstrated the undeniable strength and reliability of the PoW consensus model through sheer market saturation, and of course, its persistency.
In addition to the cost of powerful computing hardware, miners prove that they are benefiting the network by expending energy in the form of electricity, by solving and hashing away complex math problems on their computers, utilizing any suitable tools that they have at their disposal. The mathematics involved in securing proof of work revolve around unique algorithms, each with their own benefits and vulnerabilities, and can require different software/hardware to mine depending on the coin.
Because each block has a unique and entirely random hash, or “puzzle” to solve, the “work” has to be performed for each block individually and the difficulty of the problem can be increased as the speed at which blocks are solved increases.
Hashrates and Hardware Types
While proof of work is an effective means of securing a blockchain, it inherently promotes competition amongst miners seeking higher and higher hashrates due to the rewards earned by the node who wins the right to add the next block. In turn, these higher hash rates benefit the blockchain, providing better security when it’s a result of a well distributed/decentralized network of miners.
When Bitcoin first launched its genesis block, it was mined exclusively by CPUs. Over the years, various programmers and developers have devised newer, faster, and more energy efficient ways to generate higher hashrates; some by perfecting the software end of things, and others, when the incentives are great enough, create expensive specialized hardware such as ASICs (application-specific integrated circuit). With the express purpose of extracting every last bit of hashing power, efficiency being paramount, ASICs are stripped down, bare minimum, hardware representations of a specific coin’s algorithm.
This gives ASICS a massive advantage in terms of raw hashing power and also in terms of energy consumption against CPUs/GPUs, but with significant drawbacks of being very expensive to design/manufacture, translating to a high economic barrier for the casual miner. Due to the fact that they are virtual hardware representations of a single targeted algorithm, this means that if a project decides to fork and change algorithms suddenly, your powerful brand-new ASIC becomes a very expensive paperweight. The high costs in developing and manufacturing ASICs and the associated risks involved, make them unfit for mass adoption at this time.
Somewhere on the high end, in the vast hashrate expanse created between GPU and ASIC, sits the FPGA (field programmable gate array). FPGAs are basically ASICs that make some compromises with efficiency in order to have more flexibility, namely they are reprogrammable and often used in the “field” to test an algorithm before implementing it in an ASIC. As a precursor to the ASIC, FPGAs are somewhat similar to GPUs in their flexibility, but require advanced programming skills and, like ASICs, are expensive and still fairly uncommon.
2 Guys 1 ASIC
One of the issues with proof of work incentivizing the pursuit of higher hashrates is in how the network calculates block reward coinbase payouts and rewards miners based on the work that they have submitted. If a coin generated, say a block a minute, and this is a constant, then what happens if more miners jump on a network and do more work? The network cannot pay out more than 1 block reward per 1 minute, and so a difficulty mechanism is used to maintain balance. The difficulty will scale up and down in response to the overall nethash, so if many miners join the network, or extremely high hashing devices such as ASICs or FPGAs jump on, the network will respond accordingly, using the difficulty mechanism to make the problems harder, effectively giving an edge to hardware that can solve them faster, balancing the network. This not only maintains the block a minute reward but it has the added side-effect of energy requirements that scale up with network adoption.
Imagine, for example, if one miner gets on a network all alone with a CPU doing 50 MH/s and is getting all 100 coins that can possibly be paid out in a day. Then, if another miner jumps on the network with the same CPU, each miner would receive 50 coins in a day instead of 100 since they are splitting the required work evenly, despite the fact that the net electrical output has doubled along with the work. Electricity costs miner’s money and is a factor in driving up coin price along with adoption, and since more people are now mining, the coin is less centralized. Now let’s say a large corporation has found it profitable to manufacture an ASIC for this coin, knowing they will make their money back mining it or selling the units to professionals. They join the network doing 900 MH/s and will be pulling in 90 coins a day, while the two guys with their CPUs each get 5 now. Those two guys aren’t very happy, but the corporation is. Not only does this negatively affect the miners, it compromises the security of the entire network by centralizing the coin supply and hashrate, opening the doors to double spends and 51% attacks from potential malicious actors. Uncertainty of motives and questionable validity in a distributed ledger do not mix.
When technology advances in a field, it is usually applauded and welcomed with open arms, but in the world of crypto things can work quite differently. One of the glaring flaws in the current model and the advent of specialized hardware is that it’s never ending. Suppose the two men from the rather extreme example above took out a loan to get themselves that ASIC they heard about that can get them 90 coins a day? When they join the other ASIC on the network, the difficulty adjusts to keep daily payouts consistent at 100, and they will each receive only 33 coins instead of 90 since the reward is now being split three ways. Now what happens if a better ASIC is released by that corporation? Hopefully, those two guys were able to pay off their loans and sell their old ASICs before they became obsolete.
This system, as it stands now, only perpetuates a never ending hashrate arms race in which the weapons of choice are usually a combination of efficiency, economics, profitability and in some cases control.
Implications of Centralization
This brings us to another big concern with expensive specialized hardware: the risk of centralization. Because they are so expensive and inaccessible to the casual miner, ASICs and FPGAs predominantly remain limited to a select few. Centralization occurs when one small group or a single entity controls the vast majority hash power and, as a result, coin supply and is able to exert its influence to manipulate the market or in some cases, the network itself (usually the case of dishonest nodes or bad actors).
This is entirely antithetical of what cryptocurrency was born of, and since its inception many concerted efforts have been made to avoid centralization at all costs. An entity in control of a centralized coin would have the power to manipulate the price, and having a centralized hashrate would enable them to affect network usability, reliability, and even perform double spends leading to the demise of a coin, among other things.
The world of crypto is a strange new place, with rapidly growing advancements across many fields, economies, and boarders, leaving plenty of room for improvement; while it may feel like a never-ending game of catch up, there are many talented developers and programmers working around the clock to bring us all more sustainable solutions.
The Rise of FPGAs
With the recent implementation of the commonly used coding language C++, and due to their overall flexibility, FPGAs are becoming somewhat more common, especially in larger farms and in industrial setting; but they still remain primarily out of the hands of most mining enthusiasts and almost unheard of to the average hobby miner. Things appear to be changing though, one example of which I’ll discuss below, and it is thought by some, that soon we will see a day when mining with a CPU or GPU just won’t cut it any longer, and the market will be dominated by FPGAs and specialized ASICs, bringing with them efficiency gains for proof of work, while also carelessly leading us all towards the next round of spending.
A perfect real-world example of the effect specialized hardware has had on the crypto-community was recently discovered involving a fairly new project called VerusCoin and a fairly new, relatively more economically accessible FPGA. The FPGA is designed to target specific alt-coins whose algo’s do not require RAM overhead. It was discovered the company had released a new algorithm, kept secret from the public, which could effectively mine Verus at 20x the speed of GPUs, which were the next fastest hardware types mining on the Verus network.
Unfortunately this was done with a deliberately secret approach, calling the Verus algorithm “Algo1” and encouraging owners of the FPGA to never speak of the algorithm in public channels, admonishing a user when they did let the cat out of the bag. The problem with this business model is that it is parasitic in nature. In an ecosystem where advancements can benefit the entire crypto community, this sort of secret mining approach also does not support the philosophies set forth by the Bitcoin or subsequent open source and decentralization movements.
Although this was not done in the spirit of open source, it does hint to an important step in hardware innovation where we could see more efficient specialized systems within reach of the casual miner. The FPGA requires unique sets of data called a bitstream in order to be able to recognize each individual coin’s algorithm and mine them. Because it’s reprogrammable, with the support of a strong development team creating such bitstreams, the miner doesn’t end up with a brick if an algorithm changes.
All is not lost thanks to.. um.. Technology?
Shortly after discovering FPGAs on the network, the Verus developers quickly designed, tested, and implemented a new, much more complex and improved algorithm via a fork that enabled Verus to transition smoothly from VerusHash 1.0 to VerusHash 2.0 at block 310,000. Since the fork, VerusHash 2.0 has demonstrated doing exactly what it was designed for- equalizing hardware performance relative to the device being used while enabling CPUs (the most widely available “ASICs”) to mine side by side with GPUs, at a profit and it appears this will also apply to other specialized hardware. This is something no other project has been able to do until now. Rather than pursue the folly of so many other projects before it- attempting to be “ASIC proof”, Verus effectively achieved and presents to the world an entirely new model of “hardware homogeny”. As the late, great, Bruce Lee once said- “Don’t get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water.”
In the design of VerusHash 2.0, Verus has shown it doesn’t resist progress like so many other new algorithms try to do, it embraces change and adapts to it in the way that water becomes whatever vessel it inhabits. This new approach- an industry first- could very well become an industry standard and in doing so, would usher in a new age for proof of work based coins. VerusHash 2.0 has the potential to correct the single largest design flaw in the proof of work consensus mechanism- the ever expanding monetary and energy requirements that have plagued PoW based projects since the inception of the consensus mechanism. Verus also solves another major issue of coin and net hash centralization by enabling legitimate CPU mining, offering greater coin and hashrate distribution.
Digging a bit deeper it turns out the Verus development team are no rookies. The lead developer Michael F Toutonghi has spent decades in the field programming and is a former Vice President and Technical Fellow at Microsoft, recognized founder and architect of Microsoft's .Net platform, ex-Technical Fellow of Microsoft's advertising platform, ex-CTO, Parallels Corporation, and an experienced distributed computing and machine learning architect. The project he helped create employs and makes use of a diverse myriad of technologies and security features to form one of the most advanced and secure cryptocurrency to date. A brief description of what makes VerusCoin special quoted from a community member-
"Verus has a unique and new consensus algorithm called Proof of Power which is a 50% PoW/50% PoS algorithm that solves theoretical weaknesses in other PoS systems (Nothing at Stake problem for example) and is provably immune to 51% hash attacks. With this, Verus uses the new hash algorithm, VerusHash 2.0. VerusHash 2.0 is designed to better equalize mining across all hardware platforms, while favoring the latest CPUs over older types, which is also one defense against the centralizing potential of botnets. Unlike past efforts to equalize hardware hash-rates across different hardware types, VerusHash 2.0 explicitly enables CPUs to gain even more power relative to GPUs and FPGAs, enabling the most decentralizing hardware, CPUs (due to their virtually complete market penetration), to stay relevant as miners for the indefinite future. As for anonymity, Verus is not a "forced private", allowing for both transparent and shielded (private) transactions...and private messages as well"
If other projects can learn from this and adopt a similar approach or continue to innovate with new ideas, it could mean an end to all the doom and gloom predictions that CPU and GPU mining are dead, offering a much needed reprieve and an alternative to miners who have been faced with the difficult decision of either pulling the plug and shutting down shop or breaking down their rigs to sell off parts and buy new, more expensive hardware…and in so doing present an overall unprecedented level of decentralization not yet seen in cryptocurrency.
Technological advancements led us to the world of secure digital currencies and the progress being made with hardware efficiencies is indisputably beneficial to us all. ASICs and FPGAs aren’t inherently bad, and there are ways in which they could be made more affordable and available for mass distribution. More than anything, it is important that we work together as communities to find solutions that can benefit us all for the long term.
In an ever changing world where it may be easy to lose sight of the real accomplishments that brought us to this point one thing is certain, cryptocurrency is here to stay and the projects that are doing something to solve the current problems in the proof of work consensus mechanism will be the ones that lead us toward our collective vision of a better world- not just for the world of crypto but for each and every one of us.
submitted by Godballz to EtherMining [link] [comments]

Is Genesis Mining worth it? I created a Genesis Mining calculator in Google Sheets to find out

TL;DR: I attempt to overcome the pitfalls of forecasting genesis mining contract profitability for Ethereum, Monero, and Zcash.
The original Medium post can be found here: https://medium.com/@spreadstreet/is-genesis-mining-worth-it-a-genesis-mining-profitability-calculator-youll-actually-use-a06d916bf7bc
BitPay is on pace to process over $1B annually in bitcoin payment acceptance and payouts, and has already grown their payments dollar volume 328% year-over-year, according to a recent blog post on the BitPay website.
The very nature of cryptocurrencies requires transactions to be verified by miners. What does this mean?
  1. Cryptocurrency transactions are verified by a network of nodes, then recorded in a publicly distributed ledger known as a “blockchain”, which authenticates the coins as monetary units of measurement – or money.
  2. Cryptocurrency mining refers to coins created as a reward in which the users of the network verify and record transactions on this very blockchain. Users who are able to successfully verify the transactions receive fees and rewards in the form of brand new coins.
And Genesis Mining stands as the largest cryptocurrency cloud mining company in the world.
A user can rent "hashing power" in the form of a two-year contract from Genesis for a one-time, upfront fee.
In turn, they receive daily payouts of whatever specific cryptocurrency they purchased the contract for.

THE PROBLEM

While Genesis Mining has done a great job breaking down a complex problem into an easy-to-understand business model, users consistently have one big question:
"How profitable is {x} contract?" - Everybody, ever
While the user is able to see the upfront cost, they are unable to get an idea of how many coins they will receive by the end of the contract.

WHY THE PROBLEM EXISTS

The problem exists, because of two major uncertainties surrounding cryptocurrencies:
  1. Where the price of the currency will fluctuate over time
  2. Where the network hashrate (aka, the mining power of the entire network) will fluctuate over time
Both of these inputs are extremely volatile, and have a huge degree of uncertainty in the near and distant future.
What I will attempt to do in this exercise, is build a profitability calculator for Ethereum, Monero, and Zcash. Each of these cryptocurrencies is currently available on the website as of 11/7/2017.
Each cryptocurrency has three contracts, and I will formulate 4 different scenarios to try and capture a profitability "range".
Note: Do not take any of the words in this post as financial advice or recommendations. These are merely simulations that have their own issues and pitfalls, and are not to be used as the end-all, be-all decision.

THE ASSUMPTIONS

Due to the difficulty in forecasting both price and nethash, I was forced into a few assumptions:
  1. The forecasted price method is a Monte Carlo simulation using a geometric Brownian Motion ran 1,000 times. I covered the full methodology in a prior blog post
  2. The base network hashrate follows along very closely with the movements in price. This assumption I am the least confident about, as network hash has been shown to deviate at certain times
  3. I attempt to cover the shortfall in network hash rate with two different scenarios (shown below).
  4. I assume we hold all coins until the end of the contract, and assign a value to the portfolio based on $USD
  5. I do not run any scenarios of converting a currency into another currency
  6. I do not account for any significant changes to the underlying algorithm, such as the "Casper" Ethereum update (see 'THE DIFFICULTY BOMB' below)
Obviously any slight change could drastically alter these assumptions, but let's take a look at the different scenarios.

THE SCENARIOS

Description of Scenarios
Instead of calculating just a base scenario (which every other calculator on the web does) I wanted to come up with different scenarios to get an idea of what could be.
  1. Base - Assume no change in price or network hashrate for the duration of the contract
  2. Median - Run a full 1,000 trial simulation of prices and network hash rate, and use the median values for each
  3. Conservative - The same as Median, but instead use a price forecast that is 1 standard deviation below the median price
  4. Aggressive - The same as Median, but instead use a price forecast that is 1 standard deviation above the median price

APIs USED

  1. Spreadstreet Google Sheets Add-in
  2. Bitfinex API - To pull in historical data for each currency
  3. WhatToMine API - For nethash statistics
  4. CoinMarketCap - Updated prices

ETHEREUM

The only way to utilize Ethereum is with the product from mining.
But this shortchanges the additional value of mining Ether. It is also absolutely required for securing the Ethereum network as it creates, verifies, publishes, and propagates blocks in the blockchain.
The overall term "Ethereum Mining" is the process of mining Ether. Ether is an absolute essential, as it serves as fuel for the smooth running of the Ethereum platform.
Ether is used as an incentive to motivate developers to create top notch applications.

THE DIFFICULTY BOMB

Sometime in the future (we can't be certain when), ethereum will likely switch from its proof-of-work consensus algorithm to Casper, a proof-of-stake system its developers are now in the throes of completing.
From Blockonomi:
As opposed to the PoW consensus protocol, the PoS protocol achieves consensus through stakers—sometimes referred to as minters, too—who “stake” their coins by locking them down in specialized wallets.
With these stakers at work, mining will become redundant, meaning the Ethereum network post-Casper will rely on stakers and staking pools instead of miners for its operability.
Genesis Mining has a prelim plan in place for this scenario:
The Ethererum Mining plans will run for a maximum of 24 months, however, should Ethereum (“ETH”) switch to proof-of-stake before the end of the term, we will use the leased hardware on a best-effort basis to mine the most profitable coin with that hardware for you.
Very simply put, this changes the economics of contract profitability significantly. We are going to ignore that update for now, but it may make sense to stay away from the contracts in the short-term.

THE CONTRACTS

Ethereum Mining Contracts Comparison

ONE-YEAR PRICE FORECAST

Ethereum One Year Price Simulation
Here we can see one of 1,000 price simulations run to inform our forecast for the Median, Conservative, and Aggressive scenarios.
*Why is the price so high? This is what happens when you have a volatile currency in a simulation that does not have changes in said volatility. When a currency can move 20% in one day, it is not uncommon to see price movements like this. I mean, shit, Ethereum grew 25x in one year.

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

Ethereum Profit and ROI Comparison

VERDICT

Base performance ranges from 30% to 39% ROI, and is higher than the Median scenario by ~10%.
The conservative scenario shows a loss of between 59-62%, and the aggressive scenario shows a gain between 318% and 347%.
Difficulty bomb in the near-future presents tremendous uncertainty.

MONERO

From Cryptocompare:
Monero (XMR) is a Cryptonote algorithm based cryptocurrency, it relies on Ring Signatures in order to provide a certain degree of privacy when making a transaction. Monero is a Proof of Work cryptocurrency that can be mined with computational power from a CPU or GPU. There are currently no ASICs for Monero, which means that anyone with a computer can mine it.

THE CONTRACTS

Monero Mining Contracts Comparison

ONE-YEAR PRICE FORECAST

MoneroOne Year Price Simulation
We run the same Monte Carlo simulation to inform our forecast for the Median, Conservative, and Aggressive scenarios.
Why is the price so high? See Ethereum up above.
How is it possible for the "Conservative" scenario to be higher than the base price? Good question, and i'm glad you brought it up. The Monero currency has been not only really volatile, but drifting upwards at a pretty high rate.
The results are also being skewed by a recent uptick on November 6th where the price jumped by ~18%.
This may represent an opportunity for contract investment, but more analysis is needed.

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

Monero Profit and ROI Comparison

VERDICT

Base performance ranges from 87% to 95% ROI, with performance in the Median scenario lower by 5-6%.
The conservative scenario shows a loss of between 63-64%, and the aggressive scenario shows a gain between 795% and 832%.
To reiterate, the aggressive scenario is very much influenced by the recent uptick in volatility, so be weary of those high numbers.

ZCASH

ZCash uses Equihash as an hashing algorithm, which is an asymmetric memory-hard PoW algorithm based on the generalized birthday problem (I don't know what the hell this means, but it sounds fancy).
It relies on high RAM requirements to bottleneck the generation of proofs and making ASIC development unfeasible, much like Ethereum.

THE CONTRACTS

Zcash Mining Contracts Comparison

ONE-YEAR PRICE FORECAST

Zcash One Year Price Simulation
Here we can see one of 1,000 price simulations run to inform our forecast for the Median, Conservative, and Aggressive scenarios.
*Why is the price so high? See: Ethereum up above.

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

Zcash Profit and ROI Comparison

VERDICT

Base performance ranges from 51% to 65% ROI, and surprisingly lags the Median scenario by 4-6%.
The conservative scenario shows a loss of between 56-60%, and the aggressive scenario shows a gain between 490% and 540%.

CONCLUSION

The initial upfront costs and potential profitability are hidden when investing in hashing power contracts like Genesis Mining.
However with some robust analysis, we can get a better idea of how to assess the potential profitability of a two-year deal.
As we continue to evolve our thinking, better methods and analysis will eventually surface. Hopefully this industry can become a great avenue for side income.
If you want your own copy of the analysis and calculations, you can find it here:
Genesis Mining Profit Calculator
Cheers, and happy hunting!

RELATED POSTS

How to Create an Ethereum Mining Calculator from Start to Finish
10 Statistical Price Predictions for 10 Cryptocurrencies
Bitcoin Madness: How to Simulate Bitcoin Prices in Google Sheets

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

John Young is the founder of Spreadstreet.io, former Financial Analyst for a big-ass company, and runner-up in the 6th grade spelling bee. He would have invested in Google if he knew about it...and had any money.
He is the author of the Spreadstreet blog, which has over 3 readers (not a typo). He hopes to hit 10, but honestly writing is a lot of work.
submitted by 1kexperimentdotcom to GenesisMining [link] [comments]

Is Genesis Mining worth it? I created a Genesis Mining calculator in Google Sheets to find out

TL;DR: I attempt to overcome the pitfalls of forecasting genesis mining contract profitability for Ethereum, Monero, and Zcash.
The original Medium post can be found here: https://medium.com/@spreadstreet/is-genesis-mining-worth-it-a-genesis-mining-profitability-calculator-youll-actually-use-a06d916bf7bc
BitPay is on pace to process over $1B annually in bitcoin payment acceptance and payouts, and has already grown their payments dollar volume 328% year-over-year, according to a recent blog post on the BitPay website.
The very nature of cryptocurrencies requires transactions to be verified by miners. What does this mean?
  1. Cryptocurrency transactions are verified by a network of nodes, then recorded in a publicly distributed ledger known as a “blockchain”, which authenticates the coins as monetary units of measurement – or money.
  2. Cryptocurrency mining refers to coins created as a reward in which the users of the network verify and record transactions on this very blockchain. Users who are able to successfully verify the transactions receive fees and rewards in the form of brand new coins.
And Genesis Mining stands as the largest cryptocurrency cloud mining company in the world.
A user can rent "hashing power" in the form of a two-year contract from Genesis for a one-time, upfront fee.
In turn, they receive daily payouts of whatever specific cryptocurrency they purchased the contract for.

THE PROBLEM

While Genesis Mining has done a great job breaking down a complex problem into an easy-to-understand business model, users consistently have one big question:
"How profitable is {x} contract?" - Everybody, ever
While the user is able to see the upfront cost, they are unable to get an idea of how many coins they will receive by the end of the contract.

WHY THE PROBLEM EXISTS

The problem exists, because of two major uncertainties surrounding cryptocurrencies:
  1. Where the price of the currency will fluctuate over time
  2. Where the network hashrate (aka, the mining power of the entire network) will fluctuate over time
Both of these inputs are extremely volatile, and have a huge degree of uncertainty in the near and distant future.
What I will attempt to do in this exercise, is build a profitability calculator for Ethereum, Monero, and Zcash. Each of these cryptocurrencies is currently available on the website as of 11/7/2017.
Each cryptocurrency has three contracts, and I will formulate 4 different scenarios to try and capture a profitability "range".
Note: Do not take any of the words in this post as financial advice or recommendations. These are merely simulations that have their own issues and pitfalls, and are not to be used as the end-all, be-all decision.

THE ASSUMPTIONS

Due to the difficulty in forecasting both price and nethash, I was forced into a few assumptions:
  1. The forecasted price method is a Monte Carlo simulation using a geometric Brownian Motion ran 1,000 times. I covered the full methodology in a prior blog post
  2. The base network hashrate follows along very closely with the movements in price. This assumption I am the least confident about, as network hash has been shown to deviate at certain times
  3. I attempt to cover the shortfall in network hash rate with two different scenarios (shown below).
  4. I assume we hold all coins until the end of the contract, and assign a value to the portfolio based on $USD
  5. I do not run any scenarios of converting a currency into another currency
  6. I do not account for any significant changes to the underlying algorithm, such as the "Casper" Ethereum update (see 'THE DIFFICULTY BOMB' below)
Obviously any slight change could drastically alter these assumptions, but let's take a look at the different scenarios.

THE SCENARIOS

Description of Scenarios
Instead of calculating just a base scenario (which every other calculator on the web does) I wanted to come up with different scenarios to get an idea of what could be.
  1. Base - Assume no change in price or network hashrate for the duration of the contract
  2. Median - Run a full 1,000 trial simulation of prices and network hash rate, and use the median values for each
  3. Conservative - The same as Median, but instead use a price forecast that is 1 standard deviation below the median price
  4. Aggressive - The same as Median, but instead use a price forecast that is 1 standard deviation above the median price

APIs USED

  1. Spreadstreet Google Sheets Add-in
  2. Bitfinex API - To pull in historical data for each currency
  3. WhatToMine API - For nethash statistics
  4. CoinMarketCap - Updated prices

ETHEREUM

The only way to utilize Ethereum is with the product from mining.
But this shortchanges the additional value of mining Ether. It is also absolutely required for securing the Ethereum network as it creates, verifies, publishes, and propagates blocks in the blockchain.
The overall term "Ethereum Mining" is the process of mining Ether. Ether is an absolute essential, as it serves as fuel for the smooth running of the Ethereum platform.
Ether is used as an incentive to motivate developers to create top notch applications.

THE DIFFICULTY BOMB

Sometime in the future (we can't be certain when), ethereum will likely switch from its proof-of-work consensus algorithm to Casper, a proof-of-stake system its developers are now in the throes of completing.
From Blockonomi:
As opposed to the PoW consensus protocol, the PoS protocol achieves consensus through stakers—sometimes referred to as minters, too—who “stake” their coins by locking them down in specialized wallets.
With these stakers at work, mining will become redundant, meaning the Ethereum network post-Casper will rely on stakers and staking pools instead of miners for its operability.
Genesis Mining has a prelim plan in place for this scenario:
The Ethererum Mining plans will run for a maximum of 24 months, however, should Ethereum (“ETH”) switch to proof-of-stake before the end of the term, we will use the leased hardware on a best-effort basis to mine the most profitable coin with that hardware for you.
Very simply put, this changes the economics of contract profitability significantly. We are going to ignore that update for now, but it may make sense to stay away from the contracts in the short-term.

THE CONTRACTS

Ethereum Mining Contracts Comparison

ONE-YEAR PRICE FORECAST

Ethereum One Year Price Simulation
Here we can see one of 1,000 price simulations run to inform our forecast for the Median, Conservative, and Aggressive scenarios.
*Why is the price so high? This is what happens when you have a volatile currency in a simulation that does not have changes in said volatility. When a currency can move 20% in one day, it is not uncommon to see price movements like this. I mean, shit, Ethereum grew 25x in one year.

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

Ethereum Profit and ROI Comparison

VERDICT

Base performance ranges from 30% to 39% ROI, and is higher than the Median scenario by ~10%.
The conservative scenario shows a loss of between 59-62%, and the aggressive scenario shows a gain between 318% and 347%.
Difficulty bomb in the near-future presents tremendous uncertainty.

MONERO

From Cryptocompare:
Monero (XMR) is a Cryptonote algorithm based cryptocurrency, it relies on Ring Signatures in order to provide a certain degree of privacy when making a transaction. Monero is a Proof of Work cryptocurrency that can be mined with computational power from a CPU or GPU. There are currently no ASICs for Monero, which means that anyone with a computer can mine it.

THE CONTRACTS

Monero Mining Contracts Comparison

ONE-YEAR PRICE FORECAST

MoneroOne Year Price Simulation
We run the same Monte Carlo simulation to inform our forecast for the Median, Conservative, and Aggressive scenarios.
Why is the price so high? See Ethereum up above.
How is it possible for the "Conservative" scenario to be higher than the base price? Good question, and i'm glad you brought it up. The Monero currency has been not only really volatile, but drifting upwards at a pretty high rate.
The results are also being skewed by a recent uptick on November 6th where the price jumped by ~18%.
This may represent an opportunity for contract investment, but more analysis is needed.

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

Monero Profit and ROI Comparison

VERDICT

Base performance ranges from 87% to 95% ROI, with performance in the Median scenario lower by 5-6%.
The conservative scenario shows a loss of between 63-64%, and the aggressive scenario shows a gain between 795% and 832%.
To reiterate, the aggressive scenario is very much influenced by the recent uptick in volatility, so be weary of those high numbers.

ZCASH

ZCash uses Equihash as an hashing algorithm, which is an asymmetric memory-hard PoW algorithm based on the generalized birthday problem (I don't know what the hell this means, but it sounds fancy).
It relies on high RAM requirements to bottleneck the generation of proofs and making ASIC development unfeasible, much like Ethereum.

THE CONTRACTS

Zcash Mining Contracts Comparison

ONE-YEAR PRICE FORECAST

Zcash One Year Price Simulation
Here we can see one of 1,000 price simulations run to inform our forecast for the Median, Conservative, and Aggressive scenarios.
*Why is the price so high? See: Ethereum up above.

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

Zcash Profit and ROI Comparison

VERDICT

Base performance ranges from 51% to 65% ROI, and surprisingly lags the Median scenario by 4-6%.
The conservative scenario shows a loss of between 56-60%, and the aggressive scenario shows a gain between 490% and 540%.

CONCLUSION

The initial upfront costs and potential profitability are hidden when investing in hashing power contracts like Genesis Mining.
However with some robust analysis, we can get a better idea of how to assess the potential profitability of a two-year deal.
As we continue to evolve our thinking, better methods and analysis will eventually surface. Hopefully this industry can become a great avenue for side income.
If you want your own copy of the analysis and calculations, you can find it here:
Genesis Mining Profit Calculator
Cheers, and happy hunting!

RELATED POSTS

How to Create an Ethereum Mining Calculator from Start to Finish
10 Statistical Price Predictions for 10 Cryptocurrencies
Bitcoin Madness: How to Simulate Bitcoin Prices in Google Sheets

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

John Young is the founder of Spreadstreet.io, former Financial Analyst for a big-ass company, and runner-up in the 6th grade spelling bee. He would have invested in Google if he knew about it...and had any money.
He is the author of the Spreadstreet blog, which has over 3 readers (not a typo). He hopes to hit 10, but honestly writing is a lot of work.
submitted by 1kexperimentdotcom to MoneroMining [link] [comments]

The Problem with PoW

The Problem with PoW

Miners have always had it rough..
"Frustrated Miners"


The Problem with PoW
(and what is being done to solve it)

Proof of Work (PoW) is one of the most commonly used consensus mechanisms entrusted to secure and validate many of today’s most successful cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin being one. Battle-hardened and having weathered the test of time, Bitcoin has demonstrated the undeniable strength and reliability of the PoW consensus model through sheer market saturation, and of course, its persistency.
In addition to the cost of powerful computing hardware, miners prove that they are benefiting the network by expending energy in the form of electricity, by solving and hashing away complex math problems on their computers, utilizing any suitable tools that they have at their disposal. The mathematics involved in securing proof of work revolve around unique algorithms, each with their own benefits and vulnerabilities, and can require different software/hardware to mine depending on the coin.
Because each block has a unique and entirely random hash, or “puzzle” to solve, the “work” has to be performed for each block individually and the difficulty of the problem can be increased as the speed at which blocks are solved increases.
Hashrates and Hardware Types
While proof of work is an effective means of securing a blockchain, it inherently promotes competition amongst miners seeking higher and higher hashrates due to the rewards earned by the node who wins the right to add the next block. In turn, these higher hash rates benefit the blockchain, providing better security when it’s a result of a well distributed/decentralized network of miners.
When Bitcoin first launched its genesis block, it was mined exclusively by CPUs. Over the years, various programmers and developers have devised newer, faster, and more energy efficient ways to generate higher hashrates; some by perfecting the software end of things, and others, when the incentives are great enough, create expensive specialized hardware such as ASICs (application-specific integrated circuit). With the express purpose of extracting every last bit of hashing power, efficiency being paramount, ASICs are stripped down, bare minimum, hardware representations of a specific coin’s algorithm.
This gives ASICS a massive advantage in terms of raw hashing power and also in terms of energy consumption against CPUs/GPUs, but with significant drawbacks of being very expensive to design/manufacture, translating to a high economic barrier for the casual miner. Due to the fact that they are virtual hardware representations of a single targeted algorithm, this means that if a project decides to fork and change algorithms suddenly, your powerful brand-new ASIC becomes a very expensive paperweight. The high costs in developing and manufacturing ASICs and the associated risks involved, make them unfit for mass adoption at this time.
Somewhere on the high end, in the vast hashrate expanse created between GPU and ASIC, sits the FPGA (field programmable gate array). FPGAs are basically ASICs that make some compromises with efficiency in order to have more flexibility, namely they are reprogrammable and often used in the “field” to test an algorithm before implementing it in an ASIC. As a precursor to the ASIC, FPGAs are somewhat similar to GPUs in their flexibility, but require advanced programming skills and, like ASICs, are expensive and still fairly uncommon.
2 Guys 1 ASIC
One of the issues with proof of work incentivizing the pursuit of higher hashrates is in how the network calculates block reward coinbase payouts and rewards miners based on the work that they have submitted. If a coin generated, say a block a minute, and this is a constant, then what happens if more miners jump on a network and do more work? The network cannot pay out more than 1 block reward per 1 minute, and so a difficulty mechanism is used to maintain balance. The difficulty will scale up and down in response to the overall nethash, so if many miners join the network, or extremely high hashing devices such as ASICs or FPGAs jump on, the network will respond accordingly, using the difficulty mechanism to make the problems harder, effectively giving an edge to hardware that can solve them faster, balancing the network. This not only maintains the block a minute reward but it has the added side-effect of energy requirements that scale up with network adoption.
Imagine, for example, if one miner gets on a network all alone with a CPU doing 50 MH/s and is getting all 100 coins that can possibly be paid out in a day. Then, if another miner jumps on the network with the same CPU, each miner would receive 50 coins in a day instead of 100 since they are splitting the required work evenly, despite the fact that the net electrical output has doubled along with the work. Electricity costs miner’s money and is a factor in driving up coin price along with adoption, and since more people are now mining, the coin is less centralized. Now let’s say a large corporation has found it profitable to manufacture an ASIC for this coin, knowing they will make their money back mining it or selling the units to professionals. They join the network doing 900 MH/s and will be pulling in 90 coins a day, while the two guys with their CPUs each get 5 now. Those two guys aren’t very happy, but the corporation is. Not only does this negatively affect the miners, it compromises the security of the entire network by centralizing the coin supply and hashrate, opening the doors to double spends and 51% attacks from potential malicious actors. Uncertainty of motives and questionable validity in a distributed ledger do not mix.
When technology advances in a field, it is usually applauded and welcomed with open arms, but in the world of crypto things can work quite differently. One of the glaring flaws in the current model and the advent of specialized hardware is that it’s never ending. Suppose the two men from the rather extreme example above took out a loan to get themselves that ASIC they heard about that can get them 90 coins a day? When they join the other ASIC on the network, the difficulty adjusts to keep daily payouts consistent at 100, and they will each receive only 33 coins instead of 90 since the reward is now being split three ways. Now what happens if a better ASIC is released by that corporation? Hopefully, those two guys were able to pay off their loans and sell their old ASICs before they became obsolete.
This system, as it stands now, only perpetuates a never ending hashrate arms race in which the weapons of choice are usually a combination of efficiency, economics, profitability and in some cases control.
Implications of Centralization
This brings us to another big concern with expensive specialized hardware: the risk of centralization. Because they are so expensive and inaccessible to the casual miner, ASICs and FPGAs predominantly remain limited to a select few. Centralization occurs when one small group or a single entity controls the vast majority hash power and, as a result, coin supply and is able to exert its influence to manipulate the market or in some cases, the network itself (usually the case of dishonest nodes or bad actors).
This is entirely antithetical of what cryptocurrency was born of, and since its inception many concerted efforts have been made to avoid centralization at all costs. An entity in control of a centralized coin would have the power to manipulate the price, and having a centralized hashrate would enable them to affect network usability, reliability, and even perform double spends leading to the demise of a coin, among other things.
The world of crypto is a strange new place, with rapidly growing advancements across many fields, economies, and boarders, leaving plenty of room for improvement; while it may feel like a never-ending game of catch up, there are many talented developers and programmers working around the clock to bring us all more sustainable solutions.
The Rise of FPGAs
With the recent implementation of the commonly used coding language C++, and due to their overall flexibility, FPGAs are becoming somewhat more common, especially in larger farms and in industrial setting; but they still remain primarily out of the hands of most mining enthusiasts and almost unheard of to the average hobby miner. Things appear to be changing though, one example of which I’ll discuss below, and it is thought by some, that soon we will see a day when mining with a CPU or GPU just won’t cut it any longer, and the market will be dominated by FPGAs and specialized ASICs, bringing with them efficiency gains for proof of work, while also carelessly leading us all towards the next round of spending.
A perfect real-world example of the effect specialized hardware has had on the crypto-community was recently discovered involving a fairly new project called VerusCoin and a fairly new, relatively more economically accessible FPGA. The FPGA is designed to target specific alt-coins whose algo’s do not require RAM overhead. It was discovered the company had released a new algorithm, kept secret from the public, which could effectively mine Verus at 20x the speed of GPUs, which were the next fastest hardware types mining on the Verus network.
Unfortunately this was done with a deliberately secret approach, calling the Verus algorithm “Algo1” and encouraging owners of the FPGA to never speak of the algorithm in public channels, admonishing a user when they did let the cat out of the bag. The problem with this business model is that it is parasitic in nature. In an ecosystem where advancements can benefit the entire crypto community, this sort of secret mining approach also does not support the philosophies set forth by the Bitcoin or subsequent open source and decentralization movements.
Although this was not done in the spirit of open source, it does hint to an important step in hardware innovation where we could see more efficient specialized systems within reach of the casual miner. The FPGA requires unique sets of data called a bitstream in order to be able to recognize each individual coin’s algorithm and mine them. Because it’s reprogrammable, with the support of a strong development team creating such bitstreams, the miner doesn’t end up with a brick if an algorithm changes.
All is not lost thanks to.. um.. Technology?
Shortly after discovering FPGAs on the network, the Verus developers quickly designed, tested, and implemented a new, much more complex and improved algorithm via a fork that enabled Verus to transition smoothly from VerusHash 1.0 to VerusHash 2.0 at block 310,000. Since the fork, VerusHash 2.0 has demonstrated doing exactly what it was designed for- equalizing hardware performance relative to the device being used while enabling CPUs (the most widely available “ASICs”) to mine side by side with GPUs, at a profit and it appears this will also apply to other specialized hardware. This is something no other project has been able to do until now. Rather than pursue the folly of so many other projects before it- attempting to be “ASIC proof”, Verus effectively achieved and presents to the world an entirely new model of “hardware homogeny”. As the late, great, Bruce Lee once said- “Don’t get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water.”
In the design of VerusHash 2.0, Verus has shown it doesn’t resist progress like so many other new algorithms try to do, it embraces change and adapts to it in the way that water becomes whatever vessel it inhabits. This new approach- an industry first- could very well become an industry standard and in doing so, would usher in a new age for proof of work based coins. VerusHash 2.0 has the potential to correct the single largest design flaw in the proof of work consensus mechanism- the ever expanding monetary and energy requirements that have plagued PoW based projects since the inception of the consensus mechanism. Verus also solves another major issue of coin and net hash centralization by enabling legitimate CPU mining, offering greater coin and hashrate distribution.
Digging a bit deeper it turns out the Verus development team are no rookies. The lead developer Michael F Toutonghi has spent decades in the field programming and is a former Vice President and Technical Fellow at Microsoft, recognized founder and architect of Microsoft's .Net platform, ex-Technical Fellow of Microsoft's advertising platform, ex-CTO, Parallels Corporation, and an experienced distributed computing and machine learning architect. The project he helped create employs and makes use of a diverse myriad of technologies and security features to form one of the most advanced and secure cryptocurrency to date. A brief description of what makes VerusCoin special quoted from a community member-
"Verus has a unique and new consensus algorithm called Proof of Power which is a 50% PoW/50% PoS algorithm that solves theoretical weaknesses in other PoS systems (Nothing at Stake problem for example) and is provably immune to 51% hash attacks. With this, Verus uses the new hash algorithm, VerusHash 2.0. VerusHash 2.0 is designed to better equalize mining across all hardware platforms, while favoring the latest CPUs over older types, which is also one defense against the centralizing potential of botnets. Unlike past efforts to equalize hardware hash-rates across different hardware types, VerusHash 2.0 explicitly enables CPUs to gain even more power relative to GPUs and FPGAs, enabling the most decentralizing hardware, CPUs (due to their virtually complete market penetration), to stay relevant as miners for the indefinite future. As for anonymity, Verus is not a "forced private", allowing for both transparent and shielded (private) transactions...and private messages as well"
If other projects can learn from this and adopt a similar approach or continue to innovate with new ideas, it could mean an end to all the doom and gloom predictions that CPU and GPU mining are dead, offering a much needed reprieve and an alternative to miners who have been faced with the difficult decision of either pulling the plug and shutting down shop or breaking down their rigs to sell off parts and buy new, more expensive hardware…and in so doing present an overall unprecedented level of decentralization not yet seen in cryptocurrency.
Technological advancements led us to the world of secure digital currencies and the progress being made with hardware efficiencies is indisputably beneficial to us all. ASICs and FPGAs aren’t inherently bad, and there are ways in which they could be made more affordable and available for mass distribution. More than anything, it is important that we work together as communities to find solutions that can benefit us all for the long term.
In an ever changing world where it may be easy to lose sight of the real accomplishments that brought us to this point one thing is certain, cryptocurrency is here to stay and the projects that are doing something to solve the current problems in the proof of work consensus mechanism will be the ones that lead us toward our collective vision of a better world- not just for the world of crypto but for each and every one of us.
submitted by Godballz to gpumining [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining Calculator. How to mine Bitcoin with Genesis Mining Bitcoin Mining Roi Calculator 2017 With Genesis Mining HOW TO MINE BITCOINS on Genesis Mining! 13 december Asic Miners Review

Find out what your expected return is depending on your hash rate and electricity cost. Find out if it's profitable to mine Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, DASH or Monero. Do you think you've got what it takes to join the tough world of cryptocurrency mining? Every aspect of our Bitcoin mining calculator has been developed for miners by miners. The latest version of the Bitcoin mining profit calculator makes it simple and easy to quickly calculate Bitcoin mining profits by adjusting the mining hashrate values or by selecting one of the Bitcoin mining hardware devices from the ASIC Bitcoin miners list. A bitcoin mining calculator that will help you determine the number of altcoins that have been mined. This figure will be in cahoots with the power of the ASIC mining gadgets that you have. You can also use an additional fan for a better cooling of the components. A Bitcoin wallet. Live income estimation of all known ASIC miners, updated every minute. ASIC Miner Value Aladdin Miner 16Th/s Bitcoin. Jul 2018. 16 Th/s. 1400 W. 76 db. SHA-256-$2.59 /day. Bitmain Antminer S9 (13.5Th) Sep 2017. 13.5 Th/s. 1323 W. 85 db. Cryptocurrency mining is a high risk investment, we are not responsible for any financial loss Calculate how profitable it is to ASIC mine selected altcoins in comparison to bitcoin $9,193.02 $60.54 $237.87 $70.85 $6.19 $70.46 $43.14 Follow @WhatToMine dark mode What To Mine

[index] [18054] [9616] [16909] [20790] [6986] [13028] [3787] [9632] [16587] [20270]

Bitcoin Mining Calculator.

SHA256 ASIC lisk coinbase genesis mining cloud mining genesis mining review ... genesis mining x11 genesis mining calculator genesis mining bitcoin genesis mining zcash genesis mining genesis mining calculator genesis mining bitcoin genesis mining zcash genesis mining ... WhatsMiner M3 Bitcoin ASIC Miner Demo In English - Duration: 7:20. Joe Crypto 28,069 views. BITCOIN Mining in 2019 - ASIC USB Miner - Does it make Sense ? - Duration: 11:28. ... Bitcoin Mining Roi Calculator 2017 with Genesis Mining! - Duration: 5:54. Jason Reviews TECH 2,909 views. You are not wasting even a second of mining, you start immediately. No downtime due to system crashes. You purchase hashpower that you keep for a lifetime, it's that simple! https://www.hexmining.com Bitcoin Mining with ASIC Chips in High Tech Data Center #SolveForce. ... CEO of Genesis Mining, recaps 2017 and gives an outlook on 2018 - Duration: 12:53.

Flag Counter