Address - Bitcoin.com Wiki

Ethereum Pyramid gambling scheme

Hi there,
So i've fired up this contract, Just a simple Pyramid contract. The code on etherchain is here https://etherchain.org/account/0xe31feCd188c3d0aE6785B0d697937261722bd1b0#codeDisasm
Basically how this works, You must send 1 Ether to this address. 0xe31feCd188c3d0aE6785B0d697937261722bd1b0
by sending 1 ETH to me, you are entered into the pyramid and stand to more than double your money if the tier below you fills up (triple, minus a 10 % fee, to be exact). Ethereum contracts sleep most of the time and only wake up and run when a transaction is sent to them.
If you all work together, This could make people insanely rich!
The code is here
contract Pyramid { enum PayoutType { Ether, Bitcoin }
struct Participant { PayoutType payoutType; bytes desc; address etherAddress; bytes bitcoinAddress; } Participant[] public participants; uint public payoutIdx = 0; uint public collectedFees; address public owner; address public bitcoinBridge; // used later to restrict some methods modifier onlyowner { if (msg.sender == owner) _ } // events make it easier to interface with the contract event NewParticipant(uint indexed idx); function Pyramid(address _bitcoinBridge) { owner = msg.sender; bitcoinBridge = _bitcoinBridge; } // fallback function - simple transactions trigger this function() { enter(msg.data, ''); } function enter(bytes desc, bytes bitcoinAddress) { if (msg.value < 1 ether) { msg.sender.send(msg.value); return; } if (desc.length > 16 || bitcoinAddress.length > 35) { msg.sender.send(msg.value); return; } if (msg.value > 1 ether) { msg.sender.send(msg.value - 1 ether); } uint idx = participants.length; participants.length += 1; participants[idx].desc = desc; if (bitcoinAddress.length > 0) { participants[idx].payoutType = PayoutType.Bitcoin; participants[idx].bitcoinAddress = bitcoinAddress; } else { participants[idx].payoutType = PayoutType.Ether; participants[idx].etherAddress = msg.sender; } NewParticipant(idx); if (idx != 0) { collectedFees += 100 finney; } else { // first participant has no one above them, // so it goes all to fees collectedFees += 1 ether; } // for every three new participants we can // pay out to an earlier participant if (idx != 0 && idx % 3 == 0) { // payout is triple, minus 10 % fee uint amount = 3 ether - 300 finney; if (participants[payoutIdx].payoutType == PayoutType.Ether) { participants[payoutIdx].etherAddress.send(amount); } else { BitcoinBridge(bitcoinBridge).queuePayment.value(amount)(participants[payoutIdx].bitcoinAddress); } payoutIdx += 1; } } function getNumberOfParticipants() constant returns (uint n) { return participants.length; } function collectFees(address recipient) onlyowner { if (collectedFees == 0) return; recipient.send(collectedFees); collectedFees = 0; } function setBitcoinBridge(address _bitcoinBridge) onlyowner { bitcoinBridge = _bitcoinBridge; } function setOwner(address _owner) onlyowner { owner = _owner; } 
}
contract BitcoinBridge { function queuePayment(bytes bitcoinAddress) returns(bool successful); }
Have Fun!
submitted by samnymr to ethereum [link] [comments]

When you are combining your Bitcoin wallet address and it's full length "solution" or "password" what formula are you solving/satisfying (crypto question)

When you are combining your Bitcoin wallet address and it's full length "solution" or "password" what formula are you solving/satisfying (crypto question)
sorry if I am not asking this the right way but hopefully you knwo what I mean.
Anyone have a good graphical representation of this formula?
Or none calulus sigma symbol representation .
or iterative? As in a formula suitable for a software program that would step through it sequentially ? (I realize this is not solveable/breakable that way but I want to be able to represent it in a program and in a graphic.
submitted by georedd to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Generate a bitcoin address with certain length?

Is it possible to generate a vanity bitcoin address with 27 (or however many you want within 27-34) Characters? I'm not sure if there's really a way to set a limit on how long you want the address to be. If not, it would be a pretty cool feature to add.
submitted by s3cur1ty to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

When you are combining your Bitcoin wallet address and it's full length "solution" or "password" what formula are you solving/satisfying (explain like I am five please)

When you are combining your Bitcoin wallet address and it's full length "solution" or "password" what formula are you solving/satisfyin
sorry if I am not asking this the right way but hopefully you knwo what I mean.
Anyone have a good graphical representation of this formula?
Or none calulus sigma symbol representation .
or iterative? As in a formula suitable for a software program that would step through it sequentially ? (I realize this is not solveable/breakable that way but I want to be able to represent it in a program and in a graphic.
submitted by georedd to crypto [link] [comments]

When you are combining your Bitcoin wallet address and it's full length "solution" or "password" what formula are you solving/satisfying? (explain like I am five perhaps?)

When you are combining your Bitcoin wallet address and it's full length "solution" or "password" what formula are you solving/satisfyin
sorry if I am not asking this the right way but hopefully you knwo what I mean.
Anyone have a good graphical representation of this formula?
Or none calulus sigma symbol representation .
or iterative? As in a formula suitable for a software program that would step through it sequentially ? (I realize this is not solveable/breakable that way but I want to be able to represent it in a program and in a graphic.
submitted by georedd to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

A puzzle to celebrate the Halving! Solve it to win the ~0.03 BTC inside.

A puzzle to celebrate the Halving! Solve it to win the ~0.03 BTC inside.
(EDIT now worth ~0.05 (Thanks anon!))
Hello fellow Bitcoiners!
I have hidden the seed to a wallet containing ~0.03 (+ 0.02) BTC inside of my latest album. (It's not much, I am a robot of simple means)
Solve it then sweep the keys!


'Bifurcations' by Logic Beach is a Lo-Fi, Synth-Glitch, experimental project I've put together to celebrate the halving and to have a bit of fun. You will need the Lossless versions of the songs to solve this thing. (download the .wav files).
https://preview.redd.it/fvtegar2xdy41.png?width=2486&format=png&auto=webp&s=f02aef55825dccb854c4826dd00aa5a17d70c60e
Also, check out the Video.
The album is free on BandCamp (just enter $0.00), however if you'd like to make the contest more interesting, I am putting all proceeds into the contest wallet.
If you sweep it make a post here detailing how you solved it! or remain anonymous... I'll post the solution when it's solved.
Adress: bc1qj7467e7r5pdfpypm03wyvguupdrld0ul2gcutg


After due consideration (and constant requests), I have decided to extend this contest until June 21st.

Here is a recap of what is known with some new info:
  • The video has only two words for you. The first is 'Tree' from track 8 and another from track 9. the rest of the video is IRRELEVANT as is the album cover. it was just fun for me to make and watch along with the music, sorry if it ruined your life.
  • You are searching for 12 seed words in the bip39 format. No need to calculate any words.
  • There is an order hidden here. It is not in the lengths of songs or hidden in the rhythms of songs. "hidden" is hardly the right word for how it's placed in this album.
  • Three track names may help you in your search: songs 2,4, and 5
  • Chaos and Logistic maps or any kind of advanced mathematics will not aid you. This is 'Simple'
  • c = 300,000 km/s
  • In track three you may have to make a '-leap' of sorts
  • Morse code will only help you in tracks 1 & 2 visually and audibly
  • There are two words each in tracks 5, 6, and 7.
Alright, final hints here:
*The word in song two is BOMB. It is spelled in Morse by the drums as they pick back up. *The order is also 'hidden' in song 2 *it may be worth looking above and below the speed of light;)
Contest ends tomorrow at 17:00gmt
I'll include some last hints because nobody had found these words.
*Nothing to see in the spectra, nothing to hear in the song. It hexes me to give this one away! Hexadecimal. Bytes. It's there in the data, just make sure you view the data in the right orientation.
*Spectragraphic eyes: You see the two signals in the lowest part of the spectra here? Almost sounds like thunder!
That's it! Some one solved it! 18 confirmations at time of this edit. Well, I will post the solution if you guys are interested.
Nobody reached out to me so I take it they want to stay anonymous.
submitted by logic_beach to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The Cashaddr spec claims it can always detect six errored characters. This is incorrect, it cannot. Be careful with anything that claims to correct errors, this mistake makes such tools more dangerous.

Cashaddr is BCH's clone of BIP173.
It is modified to handle detecting additional errors at the expense of making addresses longer. Unfortunately, less care was apparently taken in the selection and validation of the parameters than BIP173. Particularly, the specification claims that "It ensures the detection of up to 6 errors in the address" but this property is not actually achieved for any supported address size.
I hadn't bothered to comment on this previously because handling 5 errors is plenty-- and any sequence of events likely to produce 6 would probably also be fairly likely to produce more in any case. As it was, this mistake wasn't of practical consequence and is just sort of the thing you'd expect from hasty changes "turn it up to 11", but otherwise harmless.
I also think it's unlikely that parameters exist which achieve the claimed behaviour without making the addresses even longer yet-- which I really doubt would be a good trade-off.
However, recently people have posted software to automatically correct errors made in typed addresses. Correction interacts poorly with mistaken beliefs about the error detection ability of the format.
BIP173 specifically recommends against correcting errors because doing so destroys the error detection safety: "An unfortunate side effect of error correction is that it erodes error detection: correction changes invalid inputs into valid inputs, but if more than a few errors were made then the valid input may not be the correct input. Use of an incorrect but valid input can cause funds to be lost irrecoverably. Because of this, implementations SHOULD NOT implement correction beyond potentially suggesting to the user where in the string an error might be found, without suggesting the correction to make."
The cashaddr spec dutifully gives a confusing paraphrase of this warning: "BCH codes allows for error correction. However, it is strongly advised that error correction is not done in an automatic manner as it may cause funds to be lost irrecoverably if done incorrectly. It may however be used to hint a user at a possible error." This text eliminates the justification and instead is easily read as expressing the concern that the correcting software might be written incorrectly rather than the concern being a fundamental trade-off between correction and detection strength.
Essentially every corrected error removes two characters from the detection ability. So if the code actually guaranteed the detection of 6 errors it could correct three errors unambiguously (though if there were more errors it would be undetected and your funds would be destroyed), but cashaddr does not actually have that property though the spec claims it does. Similarly, if some software corrected only two errors it would still have two errors worth of detection remaining-- but it doesn't because the code cannot guarantee the detection of 6 errors.
I'm unsure how this mistake was made. Validating the error handling capacity of these codes is tricky and computationally expensive. If the search were implemented completely naively it would have to evaluate more than 252 candidate error patterns to check for up to 6 errors in length 42 for each candidate set of parameters that were evaluated. To create BIP173 we had to invent a multitude of novel algebraic optimizations to make the search tractable. Deadalnix claims, however, that our published software wasn't used to create cashaddr. I asked deadalnix for the software used to derive cashaddr, but I guess he lost interest in the discussion.
In any case, this flaw isn't a big deal unless you start correcting errors. I recommend taking BIP173's advice and limit any error 'correction' to just hinting to users characters they should double check.
Cheers,
submitted by nullc to btc [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to conspiracy [link] [comments]

dxDAO aims to power DeFi protocols through decentralized governance

I found this article on internet. It's repost of it to help educate people about all DXDao advantages:
These are positive and necessary steps for DeFi. The new governance structures are intended to help coordinate across community stakeholders and make better decisions. These dynamics are influenced by the issues covered in Dose of DeFi, but I believe they deserve their own focused analysis.
Govern This aims to educate token holders and make them better voters. Emphasis will be placed on specific governance proposals and relaying community governance discussions on forums and weekly calls.
Governance is a coordination technology that has helped countries and companies build more than the sum of their parts. Blockchains are also a coordination technology, but for computers, not humans***.*** Govern This will track the development of the melding of these two over the coming years.
Like governance, Govern This is a work in progress. I would appreciate any feedback on format, topics covered or any other suggestions to make the newsletter better. Just hit reply.
The first issue of Govern This is below. Please click here to subscribe.
Thanks for reading,
Chris
📷
dxDAO aims to power DeFi protocols through decentralized governance
Gnosis launched a long-awaited DEX last week with batched auctions for low-liquidity trade pairs. The front-end, Mesa.Eth.Link is owned and operated by dxDAO, a decentralized collective that hopes to power other DeFi protocols.
While dYdX does not have any specific governance plans (yet), this tweet from dYdX founder Antonio Juliano is a common approach to governance.
📷Antonio Juliano @AntonioMJuliano3) 0x should focus less on governance in the short term. It’s way more important to first build something with a large amount of adoption that’s worth governing
December 6th 2018
3 Retweets62 Likes
The tweet at the end of 2018 was in response to 0x and its native token, ZRX. The project was popular but the token had no use case outside of governance.
This governance strategy – build now, decentralize later – is widely accepted in the space and is perhaps best exemplified by the A16Z’s Jesse Walden’s post, “Progressive Decentralization: A Playbook for Building Crypto Applications”, which the A16Z-backed Compound has essentially implemented (more in the section below).
dxDAO, on the other hand, maintains that decentralization must come at the beginning or else the core team and investors will have an outsized influence on the project in formal (token voting) or informal ways (dictators for life).
Background
dxDAO was launched in May 2019, spun out of a collaboration between Gnosis and DAOstack over managing the DutchX platform. dxDAO’s key governance design is separating financial rights to the DAO (DXD) from voting power over the DAO (Reputation). It used an Edgeware-style lock drop to distribute reputation to stakeholders in May of last year. Any user could lock up ETH or an accepted ERC-20 for a month and receive Reputation, which are voting rights in dxDAO, even though it is not a token and cannot be transferred.
Over 400 unique Ethereum addresses participated in the distribution scheme. Gnosis went through a pretty extensive process in July 2019 to “step back” from its involvement in the DAO, and since then, the community and dxDAO have aligned behind a mission of “putting the ‘De’ in Decentralized Finance”.
Following on last week’s launch of Mesa.ETH.Link, dxDAO is conducting a fundraiser or (“DAICO”?) to help fund its new slate of DeFi products, including a prediction market platform (Omen) and a privacy-centric DeFi dashboard (Mix).
Project launch is typically when a project is most centralized. Execution is hard and direction and accountability are important. dxDAO’s approach will be an interesting counterexample to the “decentralize later” trend and may provide insight into new governance strategies.
Click here for more information about the dxDAO fundraiser.
Here’s what is on the dxDAO docket this week:
Compound governance goes live, has it found Market-Protocol-Fit?
Since its founding in 2017, Compound has executed with an almost flawless record: no bugs/hacks, a major protocol upgrade and a big name fundraise (twice).
But all of that has been because Compound, the company, has executed well, but can protocol development and the growth of the platform be sustained with community management? We shall see.
Compound’s governance system could not be simpler. Anyone with at least 1% of COMP can submit a proposal of executable code. COMP holders have a 3 day voting period; the proposal passes with a majority of token votes AND a 4% quorum of all COMP tokens.
The 1% minimum for proposal submission is a good anti-Sybil mechanism but it greatly limits participation by small users. There is delegation, so you could imagine a “proposal petition” where you would delegate your COMP to a proposal instead of signing your name.
Compound is clearly taking the “less governance is the best governance” approach. This has worked surprisingly well with Bitcoin and Ethereum, which of course, do not have any formal governance, but those communities clearly have informal governance systems that make decisions.
The biggest governance question for Compound: who is the community?
Market-Protocol-Fit
Other Internet has an intriguing essay on the emergent order from new blockchain tokens and their communities. It is worth a read. It discusses the emergent iteration that blockchains – as a technology and a community – go through to find a niche, both in culture and product.
While it focuses on base-layer blockchains that launch with a token, the essay underscores the most underrated governance element: token distribution. It quotes an insightful tweet from Eric Wall
📷Eric Wall @ercwlA question that keeps me up at night: Is it possible to create a rubbish coin based on advanced bullshit, build a community of misguided fans nevertheless, run it centralized for 5 yrs, hardfork-copy the design of a real working project, keep the community and become a success?
keysheet @keysheet
@ErcWll was one of the first vocal critics of IOTA back in 2017, shortly before the project hit a market cap of $15B. https://t.co/2267e8LEpl Today, the project is down 99% and appears to be brutally falling apart. A thread:
February 13th 2020
17 Retweets163 Likes
Before Bitcoin could harden its code and find ‘Digital Gold’ and before Ethereum found ‘DeFi’ and ships ETH2.0, both needed to find a “a strong community of believers” in order to create a “virtuous cycle between headless brands and infrastructural build-out to progressively realize [their] initial promise.”
Communities are connected through a wide spread token distribution, Bitcoin through cypherpunks and online drugs and Ethereum through a global ICO (what Teo Leibowitz called “The Immaculate ICO”).
$COMP distribution
The biggest “news” has been details about $COMP distribution:
There are no explicit plans yet, but the widely held assumption is that the COMP distribution will be determined by the interest earned and paid by users on the protocol since its inception. This is a clever way that only incentivizes more use of the protocol and is hard to game because interests accrues over time.
But the question still remains, what will the COMP community look like and what values will it espouse? Can emergent cultures arise out of Silicon Valley too?
Here’s what is on the Compound docket this week:
Maker and wBTC, a test case for the MIP process
While Maker had planned to spend Q2 moving forward with their upgraded governance process, most of its focus has been on restoring the Dai peg.
For more on how the Maker governance process has expanded outside the core community, check out the previous edition of Govern This.
Here’s what is on the Maker docket this week:
Governance and Risk meeting (April 23)
Single Collateral Dai shutdown – the process has begun. A poll passed with May 12 as the official SCD shutdown. Just yesterday, an executive just passed yesterday to make the MKR oracle fee-less, which will help with migration. Many in the community think the migration of debt from SCD will do more than enough to restore the peg.
13 MIPs and 2 sub proposals – Core to the new Maker governance process is the “Maker Improvement Proposals (MIPs), which are modeled off of BIPs (for Bitcoin) and EIPs (for Ethereum). The two sub-proposals are to appoint the Smart Contracts Team and assign Charles St. Louis as the MIP editor.
The 13 MIPs are listed below:
- MIP1 (Maker Governance Paradigms)- MIP2 (Launch Period)- MIP3 (Governance Cycle)- MIP4 (MIP Amendment and Removal Process)- MIP5 (Emergency Voting System)- MIP6 (Collateral Onboarding Form/Forum Template)- MIP7 (Onboarding and Offboarding Domain Teams for Collateral Onboarding)- MIP8 (Domain Greenlight)- MIP9 (Community Greenlight)- MIP10 (Oracle Management)- MIP11 (Collateral Onboarding General Risk Model Management)- MIP12 (Collateral and Risk Parameter Management)
By and large, the MIPs codify many of the informal Maker governance processes. There is currently a request for comments period (MIP forum) and there will be an informal poll on Monday, April 27 on whether to proceed with the 13 MIPs and 2 sub proposals. If it’s a “Yes”, than an executive for an official ratification vote would start on May 1 and lasts for 4 days. If it passes, the official governance cycle will begin and the rest of the MIPs will likely be approved from May 4 – 6.
Other Governing Things
That’s it! Feedback definitely appreciated. Just hit reply. Written in Brooklyn where it rained all day. No euchre today, but yesterday was epic.
Govern This is written by Chris Powers. Opinions expressed are my own. All content is for informational purposes and is not intended as investment advice.
submitted by yaroslav_karpov to CryptoMoonShots [link] [comments]

Find the seed hidden in this album and win 0.05 BTC! It's still unsolved!

I have hidden the seed to a wallet containing ~0.05 BTC inside of my latest album. (It's not much, I am a robot of simple means)
Solve it then sweep the keys!


'Bifurcations' by Logic Beach is a Lo-Fi, Synth-Glitch, experimental project I've put together to celebrate the halving and to have a bit of fun. You will need the Lossless versions of the songs to solve this thing. (download the .wav files).
https://preview.redd.it/fvtegar2xdy41.png?width=2486&format=png&auto=webp&s=f02aef55825dccb854c4826dd00aa5a17d70c60e
Also, check out the Video.
The album is free on BandCamp (just enter $0.00), however if you'd like to make the contest more interesting, I am putting all proceeds into the contest wallet.
If you sweep it make a post here detailing how you solved it! or remain anonymous... I'll post the solution when it's solved.
Adress: bc1qj7467e7r5pdfpypm03wyvguupdrld0ul2gcutg


After due consideration (and constant requests), I have decided to extend this contest until June 21st.

Here is a recap of what is known with some new info:
submitted by logic_beach to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Partially redeeming a Casascius physical bitcoin - help request

Overview of problem
I have a Casascius physical bitcoin and I am unable to add its digital contents to a wallet. It seems that the key is not the right length or format. I started to get out of my depth with talk of things like a Minikey format.
I removed the hologram when I was given it years ago as I was curious what was under there. I don't want to sell it instead I want to add its 1 BTC value to a wallet so I can partially redeem it and keep the physical brass as a collectible.
What I have observed and tried (apologies in advance for butchering terms)
I've searched several sites, including here and haven't been able to find a current answer for the new style of keys and wallets.
I put the seven character code from the hologram into the casascius.uberbills dot com site and it gives me a 33 character key, tells me it's version 2 and confirms that it has a 1 BTC value
I've tried to import it into a Blockchain wallet but get the error "this private key does not match the watch only address above" when I enter the private key under the hologram. For some reason it seems like a different public address is generated when I enter the 33 char code.
I tried to import it into a Jaxx Liberty wallet but it doesn't recognise the minikey or 33 char code as valid.
I've basically run up against my level of knowledge and don't know what the next steps are of if I'm missing something bleeding obvious. I double and triple checked any data entry because I saw this was a common problem.
I'd really appreciate any help or pointers the community can give me.
Thanks
Edit:
Solution
I followed the advice given by u/murbul in reply to my post
You might struggle to find a wallet that natively supports MINI keys these days since it's an old format that never really took off apart from Casascius coins. So your best bet is to use a tool to convert it to a real private key (starting with 5) and import/sweep that into a wallet.
You can convert it on the Wallet Details tab of https://www.bitaddress.org/ - For 1 BTC I'd be paranoid enough to recommend downloading the source and doing everything offline: https://github.com/pointbiz/bitaddress.org
I used the site and one of the keys generated was one starting with '5' (Private Key WIF). I used this in Jaxx Liberty in the 'Paper Wallet Import' function under tools and it came right across.
I’m very happy.
submitted by PickledNumbat to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Blockchain-Free CloudCoin Claims Secure Email-to-Email Transactions

Blockchain-Free CloudCoin Claims Secure Email-to-Email Transactions
A new digital currency called CloudCoin sets out to address some of the main issues with the current batch of cryptocurrencies by removing the blockchain technology.
1900Total views29Total sharesListen to article3:31📷NEWS
https://preview.redd.it/jz3huzkah0b51.png?width=717&format=png&auto=webp&s=b2cfdad95038b2685425fba9bb8b1649440d2777
CloudCoin announced the launch of its cloud-based digital currency on July 15. With no blockchain, public ledger, accounts or encryption, CloudCoin claims it is the most private digital currency ever created.
It uses technology adapted from the internet’s Domain Name Service, or DNS, to enable secure email-to-email or email-to-wallet transactions. CloudCoin says that it eliminates systemic risk of theft by not requiring private keys which can be stolen, and that lost CloudCoins can even be recovered.

Not Bitcoin, not blockchain

Since the release of the Bitcoin white paper back in 2008, cryptocurrencies have been inextricably linked with the blockchain technology that underpins them. But what if a currency was secured with a technology other than blockchain? Would it even still be classed as a cryptocurrency?
CloudCoin set out to address some of the issues that come with blockchain-based digital currencies. President of the CloudCoin Consortium, Sean Worthington, explained:
“Cryptocurrencies built on blockchains come with a host of challenges, making it difficult to do simple things like buy a cup of coffee. Transactions take too long, fees are too high and it is still too difficult to scale. We developed CloudCoin to overcome these challenges and pave the way for mass adoption.”

Low energy consumption means free transactions

The global Domain Name System services billions of users, is scalable, and has not been brought down since it went live in 1985.
CloudCoin’s Redundant Array of Independent Detection Agents, or RAIDA, is based on this technology and is currently distributed across 25 national jurisdictions. The cloud-based network uses so little power that these transactions can be made with zero gas fees.
Plus, even if governments or hackers try to take the RAIDA down, the currency supposedly can’t be double-spent, hacked or spied upon. RAIDA knows nothing about who owns the coins, as its purpose is simply to authenticate. All of the information about the coins is held directly in the coins themselves.

Cash-like qualities, but digital

Each CloudCoin is a file, consisting of a serial number and authentication data. The authentication data is shredded, rather than encrypted, and distributed across the RAIDA. This method is claimed to be quantum-secure.
Much like cash, the owner of the file has the authentication data and can control the coin. When ownership is transferred, the new owner changes this data to ensure exclusive ongoing access.
Transfer speeds depend on the number of coins that need to be authenticated, but the RAIDA can routinely secure transactions of 100,000 CloudCoins in under 3.5 seconds.
Because CloudCoins are file-based, they can be transferred via the free encrypted email service, ProtonMail, or with a Sky Wallet. ProtonMail also lets users pay for its premium services with Bitcoin (BTC), although as Cointelegraph reported, it hasn’t cashed any out to fiat in years.
Of course, being file-based, CloudCoin can’t be subdivided or split, and comes in set denominations of one, five, 25, 100 and 250 CloudCoin units. The currency is not inflationary and the total number of coins in the cloud never changes from 16,777,216, which is fixed by the length of the serial number in bytes.
To avoid a rash of copycat coins springing up, CloudCoin has also patented its “Method of Authenticating and Exchanging Virtual Currencies,” making it what is claimed to be the world’s first patented currency.
submitted by voron7477 to voron7477 [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to Money [link] [comments]

This is just a theory. What do you guys think?

Just theory if Satoshi wrote the name of the creator which would be 256th puzzle of a puzzle game 14 years ago, and the card has written "find me" in Japanese at side forming this puzzle. Just for looking this picture is it possible to find this gentleman on the internet as the location from the picture been discovered " Kaysersberg, Alsace, France". It would be a great coincidence if the owner of the 256th card was really Satoshi in a ranking of 256 cards? This will be very important figure for 256 Bitcoin value. People might on here might ask why and explain your theory? Well just for a explanation this puzzle is complex and if his card is 256th puzzle card and is a value of 256. What if the answer is 2SHA256 which SHA stands for Secure Hash Algorithm that Bitcoin has been using for mining and address generation. This hash is one of those high security cryptography functions and also the length would have data fix that might contribute of harmony between these blocks.
1.) For example, word would be "squanch" with SHA256 encryption -> “5bfdd901369fbb2ae5052ab5307c74f97651e09bd83e80cf3153952bb81cc7b8”.
2.) satoshi -> DA2876B3EB31EDB4436FA4650673FC6F01F90DE2F1793C4EC332B2387B09726F
3.) Satoshi -> 002688CC350A5333A87FA622EACEC626C3D1C0EBF9F3793DE3885FA254D7E393
** you can play around with it => https://passwordsgenerator.net/sha256-hash-generato **
SHA256 with its code consist 32 bits and 64 digits, so we should not get too far from solving this puzzles some how if this was an method of solving this question via value. Also, the puzzle from this game began in which is called "The city of Perplex". This game has a original concept and also promise reward $200,000 when all the puzzles on the cards are solved. But, think about it f the 256th card is Satoshi that has not been solved it has not been resolved on card number 238. As you can imagine, the 256th card, which is “Satoshi”, has not been resolved. Otherwise, it has not been resolved on card number 238. Hint that our card gives to everyone to solve the puzzle is “ My name is Satoshi ...”. Needless to say with the game has been on the market since 1-2 years before the generation of Bitcoin and Crypto has started. Although I"m also thinking the man might not be Satoshi as his a player, so looking that either looks and style similar is only hope.
submitted by LeftSubstance to FindSatoshi [link] [comments]

Implementing support for Gleec coin

I'm trying to make a custom Trezor implementation that supports Gleec coin (BTC clone).
I have done the following steps:
  1. Inside the trezor-firmware in "common/defs/bitcoin" I included the "gleecBtc.json" configuartion:
After building the firmware.bin file I found out via hex editor that it doesn't contain the configuration. Then I included a new configuration inside "core/src/apps/common/coininfo.py":
.... if not utils.BITCOIN_ONLY: if False: pass elif name == "GleecBTC": return CoinInfo( coin_name=name, coin_shortcut="GLEEC", decimals=8, address_type=35, address_type_p2sh=38, maxfee_kb=2000000, signed_message_header="GleecBTC Signed Message:\n", xpub_magic=0x0488b21e, xpub_magic_segwit_p2sh=0x049d7cb2, xpub_magic_segwit_native=0x04b24746, bech32_prefix="fg", cashaddr_prefix=None, slip44=460, segwit=True, fork_id=None, force_bip143=False, decred=False, negative_fee=False, curve_name='secp256k1', extra_data=False, timestamp=False, overwintered=False, confidential_assets=None, ) .... 
Finally the gleec configuration was inside the firmware.bin file. And I flashed it on the hardware.
2) Inside the trezor-connect in "src/data/coins.json" I included:
.... { "address_type": 35, "address_type_p2sh": 38, "bech32_prefix": "fg", "blockbook": [ "https://blockbook.gleechain.com/" ], "blocktime_seconds": 300, "cashaddr_prefix": null, "coin_label": "GleecBTC", "coin_name": "GleecBTC", "coin_shortcut": "GLEEC", "consensus_branch_id": null, "curve_name": "secp256k1", "decimals": 8, "decred": false, "default_fee_b": { "Economy": 70, "High": 200, "Low": 10, "Normal": 140 }, "dust_limit": 546, "extra_data": false, "force_bip143": false, "fork_id": null, "hash_genesis_block": "000000000019d6689c085ae165831e934ff763ae46a2a6c172b3f1b60a8ce26f", "max_address_length": 34, "maxfee_kb": 2000000, "min_address_length": 27, "minfee_kb": 1000, "name": "GleecBTC", "segwit": true, "shortcut": "GLEEC", "signed_message_header": "GleecBTC Signed Message:\n", "slip44": 460, "support": { }, "timestamp": false, "xprv_magic": 76066276, "xpub_magic": 76067358, "xpub_magic_segwit_native": 78792518, "xpub_magic_segwit_p2sh": 77429938 }, .... 
3) So after running:
await TrezorConnect.getAddress({ path: "m/44'/460'/0'/0/0", coin: 'GLEEC' }); 
I get the following error:
Invalid parameters: Coin not found. 
I don't even see communication or data reaching the Trezor device after the call.
Do I need to add the coin inside other configuration file? Are configurations enough in order to support the coin or I need to implement some features?
submitted by Slav-0 to TREZOR [link] [comments]

Questions about private keys

Can a bitcoin private key be used for other altcoins (e.g. litecoin, ethereum)? Will they have the same public addresses as well? Are there exceptions to this?
Why do some people store their bitcoin private key as base 64, base 58, WIF, or anything other than Hexadecimal?
submitted by megabrains113 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to economy [link] [comments]

Find the seed hidden in this album and win 0.05 BTC! It's still unsolved!

I have hidden the seed to a wallet containing ~0.05 BTC inside of my latest album. (It's not much, I am a robot of simple means)
Solve it then sweep the keys!

'Bifurcations' by Logic Beach is a Lo-Fi, Synth-Glitch, experimental project I've put together to celebrate the halving and to have a bit of fun. You will need the Lossless versions of the songs to solve this thing. (download the .wav files).
https://preview.redd.it/fvtegar2xdy41.png?width=2486&format=png&auto=webp&s=f02aef55825dccb854c4826dd00aa5a17d70c60e
Also, check out the Video.
The album is free on BandCamp (just enter $0.00), however if you'd like to make the contest more interesting, I am putting all proceeds into the contest wallet.
If you sweep it make a post here detailing how you solved it! or remain anonymous... I'll post the solution when it's solved.
Adress: bc1qj7467e7r5pdfpypm03wyvguupdrld0ul2gcutg

After due consideration (and constant requests), I have decided to extend this contest until June 21st.
Here is a recap of what is known with some new info:
submitted by logic_beach to bitcoinpuzzles [link] [comments]

Can I send send bitcoins to non-existent address "Jane I hate you" or some silly shit like that?

I would like to save some phrase in bitcoin blockchain. If so what are limitations on the length?
submitted by user84340 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin and Meritocratic Capitalism

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to Capitalism [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to investing_discussion [link] [comments]

What is a Bitcoin Node? - Step by Step Explanation 1hhias6noggkbFESPnXvGNfA799Fb5qCe Total Length, ID, Flags, and Fragment Offset Bitcoin Q&A: Public keys vs. addresses IPv6 Address Prefix Length

A Bitcoin address is an identifier of 26-35 alphanumeric characters. This information is now outdated but it was true at the time this question was asked look at morsecoder's answer. With the introduction of Bech32 type addresses in 2017, the minimum and maximum length of a Bitcoin address have changed. According to BIP 173: A Bitcoin address, or simply address, is an identifier of 26-35 alphanumeric characters, beginning with the number 1, 3 or bc1 that represents a possible destination for a bitcoin payment. Addresses can be generated at no cost by any user of Bitcoin. For example, using Bitcoin Core, one can click "New Address" and be assigned an address.It is also possible to get a Bitcoin address using an A Bitcoin address, or simply address, is an identifier of 27-34 alphanumeric characters, beginning with the number 1, 3 or bc1, that represents a possible destination for a bitcoin payment.Addresses can be generated at no cost by any user of Bitcoin. It is also possible to get a Bitcoin address using an account at an exchange or online wallet service. An additional benefit is that it further reduces the length of the bitcoin address. Doing a base58 conversion by hand is an intriguing process. One that you can see here. To cut a long process short, the 50 character bitcoin address reduces to anything between 26-35 characters long with the most common length being 33 or 34 characters. The A Bitcoin address which also goes by the name as simply “address”, is used for representing an identifier consisting of 26-35 alphanumeric characters. A typical Bitcoin address begins with the number 1 or 3.

[index] [30438] [9590] [17495] [3765] [16056] [9590] [20484] [12972] [24926] [3181]

What is a Bitcoin Node? - Step by Step Explanation

Unsubscribe from My Bitcoin Addresses? Cancel Unsubscribe. Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 0. ... Chopin - Nocturne Full length - Stefan Askenase 1954 (쇼팽-야상곡 전곡 ... He is the author of two books: “Mastering Bitcoin,” published by O’Reilly Media and considered the best technical guide to bitcoin; “The Internet of Money,” a book about why bitcoin matters. The bitcoin client contains a hardcoded list of well known DNS servers which can return a list of ip addresses of bitcoin nodes. ... A Node can also ask its peers what the length of their local ... This video demonstrates recovery of Bitcoin sent to a Litecoin address, Litecoin sent to Bitcoin addresses, BCH sent to Bitcoin addresses and Bitcoin sent to BCH addresses. How to value a bitcoin? ... network would not be in the number of telephones connected but the number and length of telephones calls being made. ... or even the number of active wallet addresses ...

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